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SLIDESHOW: Timeline of Women in the Military

How long have women been contributing to the United States' military efforts?

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The Conversation

Rev. William Barber Condemns Evangelicals Who Support Trump's Policies

"I'm a Christian evangelical, I grew up in the Christian faith, and one of the most clear public policies that you're supposed to engage in as a just society is fairness toward the strangers, immigrants," Barber said.

The NAACP and Rev. Dr. William Barber called out evangelical Christians who back President Donald Trump's family separation policy, and called the policy racist.

"We see this happening," Barber said, "and this attack on children — we know it's brown children, it wouldn't be happening if it wasn't brown children at the southern border — is white supremacy, white nationalism, being implemented in our public policy right in front of our faces."

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Toxic Work Environment at Amnesty International

Racism, sexism, and employee abuse rampant, according to a new report.

An organization that is about human rights seemingly has discriminatory and harmful practices.

KonTerra Group, a Washington, D.C.-based group completed a review of Amnesty International with psychologists, regarding the well-being of employees, and found appalling data:

"Given Amnesty's status and mission – to protect and promote human rights – the number of accounts the assessment team received of 'bullying','racism', and 'sexism' is disconcerting," the review of the human rights organization's management practices said.

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First Black Woman to Serve as Major General to be Laid to Rest at Arlington National Cemetery

"Know your job and do it well," Major General Marcelite Jordan Harris once said.

Major General Marcelite Jordan Harris, the first African-American female Major General in the U.S. Military, will be laid to rest with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery on Thursday, alongside her husband, Lt. Col. Maurice Harris, USAF (Ret.).

Harris died unexpectedly on Sept. 7, 2018, at age 75. She served more than 30 years in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of capacities.

Born Jan. 16, 1943 in Houston, Harris graduated from Kashmere High School before enrolling at Spelman College, where she earned a bachelor's degree in 1964. She was a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Harris also received an honorary doctorate of letters from Spelman and earned a B.S. in Business Management at the University of Maryland University College.

The trailblazer received her commission through Officer Training School at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas in 1965. During her tenure in the U.S. Air Force, she was the first woman aircraft maintenance officer and one of the first two women air officers commanding at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

It was a revolutionary time for women to be in the workforce.

"This was during the late 1960's," Harris told the Department of Defense in a 2013 interview. "The late '60s saw us do away with the draft. We saw civilian women going for equal pay with upward mobility. The world was just changing itself. Women were burning bras and everything in protest."

In 1975, she was named White House social aide and personnel staff officer under the presidential administrations of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.

She made history in 1991 when she became the first African-American female Brigadier General in the Air Force. Then, in 1994, she was named the first female director of maintenance and deputy chief of staff for logistics at the U.S. Air Force Headquarters, Washington, D.C.

At the Pentagon, she managed a work force of more than 125,000 technicians and managers and maintained the $260 billion Global Reach-Global Power aerospace weapons system inventory; she was promoted to Major General, according to her published obituary.

Her promotion made her the highest-ranking woman in the Air Force, and the highest-ranking Black woman in the entire Department of Defense. Before retiring in 1997, Harris helped establish a permanent office for the Committee on Women in NATO within the organization's existing Military Committee.

Former President Obama appointed Harris to the Board of Visitors of the Air Force Academy, from 2010 to 2016.

As well as having a thriving career, Harris also raised two children, Tenecia Harris and Lt. Col. Steven Harris.

The mother and history-maker offered the following career advice for those following her footsteps:

"Know your job and do it well. Know your people," she said, in an interview. "Nothing is denied you by going into the military. You are important. You're important to the mission and to the United States. You're important to the president. You are important, and that's what matters."

Harris was named Woman of the Year by the National Organization of Tuskegee Airmen in 1990, honored with the Trailblazer Award by the Black Girls Rock foundation, and received the Living Legacy Patriot Award by the Women's International Center, to name a few accolades.

A celebratory memorial service following the burial will be held at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial near Arlington National Cemetery.

Oracle Underpaid People of Color and Women by More Than $400M: Department of Labor

Oracle's "suppression of pay for its non-white, non-male employees is so extreme that it persists and gets worse over long careers," according to a federal filing.

YOUTUBE

The U.S. Department of Labor, in a federal filing on Tuesday, accused Oracle of underpaying thousands of people of color and women employees by more than $400 million. Employees with years of experience are paid as much as 25 percent less than their white male peers.

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Sen. Kamala Harris: 'I am running for president of the United States'

"Let's do this together," said the Howard University alum and member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

TWITTER

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) announced on Martin Luther King Jr. Day that she will be running for president in 2020.

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UPDATE: Trump Makes Unannounced Trip to Iraq Amid Criticism for Not Visiting Troops at Christmastime

The Trumps arrived in Iraq on Wednesday, following a "secret overnight flight."

REUTERS

UPDATE: Dec. 26, 2018 at 4:08 p.m.

In a visit that came hours after NBC News reported that President Trump was the first president since 2002 that did not visit wounded warriors or troops during Christmastime, Trump and First Lady Melania Trump met with troops stationed in Iraq, traveling there "late Christmas night," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted Wednesday afternoon.

The Trumps arrived in Iraq on Wednesday, following a "secret overnight flight."

"Trump left behind a slate of troubles in Washington, including a partial government shutdown and an unsteady economy," according to CNN. "He's also faced criticism for a series of foreign policy decisions that have left his national security team at odds."

This makes Trump's first trip to visit U.S. troops in a combat zone, after much criticism.

According to The Washington Post, the head of one of two main blocs in Iraq's Parliament, Sabah al-Saidi, "is denouncing Trump's unannounced visit, calling it a 'blatant violation of Iraq's sovereignty'." Al-Saidi is calling for an emergency session of Parliament to discuss his visit.

He said Trump should not be allowed to arrive "as if Iraq is a state of the United States" as "the American occupation of Iraq is over."

White House press secretary Sanders said Trump couldn't meet with the Iraqi prime minister because of the short notice of the president's trip and security concerns.

ORIGINAL STORY: Trump Skips Traditional Visit With Troops at Christmastime

President Donald Trump, who made history as the first reality TV president and the first president to use Twitter to fire and hire White House staff, has now become the first president since 2002 that did not visit military personnel around Christmastime.

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