Purposely Inaccurate Billboards Terrorize Poor Blacks & Latinos

This swing state's politicians have a new way to suppress voter rights.

"Racist" voter ID laws were struck down by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Oct. 2, but that hasn't stopped the state's politicians from trying to discourage Latino voters from rightfully casting their ballots on Nov. 6.


Just two weeks shy of the presidential election, a series of state-sponsored billboards reading "Si Quieres Votar, Muéstrala" (If You Want to Vote, Show It) were erected in predominantly Latino neighborhoods. The wording of the signs is highly misleading given that implementation of the law requiring photo IDs at the polls was postponed until 2013.

Sign this petition to tell Pennsylvania state officials and Clear Channel to stop intimidating Latino voters.

Former city councilman Juan Ramos is furious, say local news sources. Ramos now works for the Delaware Valley Voter Registration Education Project, a nonprofit that focuses on increasing voter registration in Philadelphia's Latino communities. "This is a very slick attempt by the state government to carry out voter suppression," he said.

But the Pennsylvania Department of State has no plans to remove the deceptive billboards. Officials say the campaign is the result of a court order to educate all voters that poll workers will ask for photo identification, although it is not yet a legal requirement.

Coincidence? You Decide

The state was slow to remove voter ID requirements from its websites: The Bucks County, Luzerne County and Borough of West Chester official websites stated until Oct. 9 that photo IDs were necessary to vote. Pontealdia.com points out that Luzerne County coincidentally has one of the fastest growing Latino populations in the nation, increasing 85 percent from 14,500 in 2000 to 26,782 in 2010. Read more data about the Latino demographic.

This intimidating billboard tactic, also has been used in Ohio, as reported by Mother Jones. Watch this video below, which shows a billboard on voter fraud in a predominantly Black community in Cincinnati.

Pennsylvania historically leans Democratic, but the state has become more of a battleground for Republicans in the 2012 election. Currently, President Obama holds an 11-point lead over Governor Romney. Other swing states include Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia and Wisconsin.

For more on voter ID laws and the election, read:

Are Voter ID Laws Racist?

The Voter-Fraud Myth: What Racist Voter ID Laws Are Really About

Are Obama & Romney Ignoring Latinos?

Why Obama & Romney Aren't Connecting With Women

Racist Obama Facebook Pages & Your Office: What Do You Need to Know?

Democrats O​utraising Republicans in Key House Races

Party leaders, encouraged by recent victories in special elections in Pennsylvania and Alabama, hope it will be enough to help them flip 24 seats needed in November to wrestle control of the chamber from Republicans.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — Democrats have a $10.5 million fundraising advantage over Republicans in the 25 most competitive races for seats the U.S. House of Representatives ahead of the November elections, according to an analysis by Reuters.

Read More Show Less

New York Governor to Allow 35,000 Paroled Felons to Vote

"They work, pay taxes, and support their families, and they should be permitted to express their opinions about the choices facing their communities through their votes, just as all citizens do," Cuomo said in a statement.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — New York State plans to restore voting rights to about 35,000 New York felons on parole who previously were barred from casting a ballot until they completed their parole, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Wednesday.

Read More Show Less

Judge Finds Kansas' Kris Kobach in Contempt of Court

Kobach is the front-running Republican candidate for Kansas governor, despite ongoing legal battles over the voter registration law he has sought to enforce as the state's top election official.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — A federal judge on Wednesday found Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach in contempt of court for disobeying her order not to enforce the state's disputed proof-of-citizenship voter registration law while the court weighed its legality.

Read More Show Less

Judge Rejects Missouri Governor's bid to Dismiss Criminal Case

The decision paved the way for the single-count felony case against Greitens, a Republican under mounting pressure from both parties to resign.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — A St. Louis judge on Thursday dealt Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens another legal setback in the sex scandal embroiling his office, refusing to dismiss a criminal invasion of privacy charge stemming from an admitted extramarital affair.

Read More Show Less

White Candidate for State House: ‘I’m a Member of the African American Community’

"I've eaten at many a fish fry held by my 'brothers' and 'sisters,' 'aunts' and 'uncles' in that community," Shipman said in his defense. "I was born a poor Black child," said Steve Martin in "The Jerk."

A Democrat hailing from North Carolina hoping to join the state House claims that he is a part of the African American community.

"I'm a member of the African American community," said Gary Shipman on Sunday. "I've been where you are. I've been in your communities."

Read More Show Less

ACLU Sues Trump Administration For Separating Immigrant Couples

The lawsuit contends the administration's actions violate the Immigration and Nationality Act and are unconstitutional, and seeks an injunction to prevent further similar detentions.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit challenging what it calls a pattern by President Donald Trump's administration of detaining illegal immigrants seeking to legalize their status based on marriages to U.S. citizens.

Read More Show Less

Timeline of Mueller Probe Of Trump Campaign And Russia

Trump has called the investigation a "witch hunt."

REUTERS

(Reuters) — The raid by FBI agents on Monday on the offices and home of U.S. President Donald Trump's longtime attorney Michael Cohen grew out of an investigation by Special Counsel Robert Mueller that has cast a cloud over Trump's presidency.

Read More Show Less