Improving Healthcare for 68,000 Black & Latino Children

A $12.8-million grant is helping University Hospitals reduce racial disparities and offer 24/7 access to healthcare.

Federal healthcare law changes dramatically impact how the  industry—hospitals, health-insurance companies and pharmas—do business today. University Hospitals in Cleveland has been aggressively reaching out to the newly insured, predominantly Blacks and Latinos. University Hospital's Case Medical Center's Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, known as UH Rainbow, is receiving a $12.8-million grant to implement a Physician Extension Team, which works to improve the healthcare of about 68,000 children on Medicaid with high rates of emergency-room visits.


Dr. Drew Hertz, medical director for UH Rainbow Care Network and an assistant clinical professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, was a guest speaker at DiversityInc's Innovation Fest! event where he explained how this innovative program will provide 24/7 access to nurses and doctors for referrals, advice and healthcare coordination. University Hospitals is one of the 2012 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospital Systems. View the video below.

For closed captions, press the CC button in the YouTube player.

Video Minutes

0:01:48 Funded by a $12.8M Federal Grant

0:03:39 The Physicians Extension Team

0:05:34 Reducing Healthcare Inefficiencies

0:08:59 Five Goals of Rainbow Care Connection

0:09:38 Six Key Programs of Rainbow Care Connection

0:09:57 Create a Physicans Network

0:10:46 Shared Savings Agreements

0:11:38 Practice-Tailored Facilitation

0:13:13 Heightened Support Services

0:13:39 Innovation: Family Care Advocates

0:14:39 Three-Part Behavioral Health Program

0:16:55 General and Targeted Outreach

0:18:10 Three-Part Telehealth Program

0:22:43 Keys to Success

Watch the other Innovation Fest! presentations from our event for more on diversity and innovation.

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