How 'Slut' and 'Sweetie' Challenge Gender Equity

Current events and research confirm the need for Women's History awareness and continued efforts for women's rights.

Women's History Month is a time to celebrate and recognize women's contributions to society as well as the progress of the women's-rights movement. But after more than 150 years, is true gender equity finally within reach?


As shown in DiversityInc's Women's History Month timeline and facts, women have made considerable progress since the beginnings of the women's-rights movement in 1857. Yet women innovators, political activists and other gender-equality pioneers have largely gone unrecognized. It's something that our nation's numerous women's-history museums are striving to change.

Here, DiversityInc provides a selection of our top resources that highlight the need for continued awareness for gender-diversity issues, as well as research and best practices for including and promoting women in business. Also read The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women for a list of the best flexible workplaces with strong talent development for women.

When Words Hinder Progress:

Is This the End of Rush Limbaugh? Advertisers Flee Show

The radio host receives explosive backlash after his misogynistic "slut" comment goes viral. He learns that in today's social-media world, negative reactions are swift.

Is Professor's 'Hi, Sweetie' Comment Sexual Harassment?

Did this university overreact when a professor called the department chair "sweetie" and chucked her chin?

Update on Giant Walmart Gender-Disparity Case, Plus Sex, Age & Disability Discrimination

Was "Good riddance, b----!" sexual harassment when a male coworker shouted this to a female financial adviser who had just resigned? Read this and other discrimination cases.

Things NEVER to Say to Women Executives

Before you make that harmless little comment to the woman in the next office, take a look at things you should never say to a female executive or coworker.

Best Practices:

How Women Benefit From Mentoring, Sponsorship

PricewaterhouseCoopers' chief diversity officer provides seven ways women can take charge and start advancing their careers.

How Kraft Increased Promotions of Women in Sales by 39%

In one of 12 case-study examples, Kraft shares how to leverage employee-resource groups to increase representation of women, especially in senior management.

What Does It Take for a Woman to Become CEO?

Against the odds, Beth Mooney became the first female CEO of a top 20 U.S. bank and is carrying on the culture of inclusion at KeyCorp.

Research Reveals:

Why Is Global Diversity So Difficult?

Our exclusive research from 17 countries explores how the norms around advancing women vary between European and Asian nations and what companies are doing to address issues of gender equity.

Study: Women Still Not Getting to the Top Levels

Women make up more than half the workforce, but they still are significantly underrepresented on corporate boards and in C-level executive positions.

Where's the Diversity in Fortune 500 CEOs?

There's a dearth of Black, Latino, Asian and women CEOs running major companies—but the DiversityInc Top 50 companies have better stats.

 

For more best practices and research on gender equity and the inclusion of women in management, visit BestPractices.DiversityInc.com.

 

70 Percent of Irish Women Voted to Legalize Abortion in Ireland Creating Landslide Victory

A most conservative country when it comes to abortion rights begins to wake up to the logical conclusion that if your gender can't bear children, you should probably stop mansplaining and man-deciding.

Presiding Officer Carmel McBride prepares the polling station for the referendum on liberalizing abortion law . / REUTERS

UPDATE: May 26, 2018

Ireland has voted to repeal its abortion ban. The Irish Times exit poll suggested that women voted by 70 percent in favor of legalizing abortion.

ORIGINAL STORY

Ireland is one of Europe's most socially conservative countries, with one of the world's strictest bans on abortion. Residents went to the polls on Friday for a "once in a generation opportunity" to decide whether to liberalize or maintain the country's abortion laws.

For Americans, conservatives trying to control abortion rights using religion sound all too familiar.

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Salma Hayek Calls for Male Stars to Get Pay Cut

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That's one idea. I'm going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!" Hayek said.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — Mexican American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women.

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Misogyny and Racism Have Catapulted Women in the polls for House Seats

Voters speak: We want more than just white men in office.

FACEBOOK

A record number of women are running for U.S. House of Representatives seats, along with women running at every level of public office. And they're winning.

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Michelle Obama: 'I Wish that Girls Could Fail as Bad as Men Do and Be OK'

The former first lady says women execs need to "really shake it up" when they get a seat at the table.

At the United State of Women Summit in Los Angeles on Saturday, former First Lady Michelle Obama talked with actor and activist Tracee Ellis Ross, star of "Black-ish," about gender equality.

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Golf Club That Called Cops on Black Women Members Faces Business Backlash, Potential Investigation

"It is appalling that someone would call the police for a non-violent incident where the only crime was being Black on a public golf course," State Sen. Vincent J. Hughes said in a statement.

After the co-owner of Grandview Golf Club in York County, Pa., called the police on five Black women members for allegedly golfing too slow, the club's business vendors are beginning to bail and a state senator is calling for an investigation.

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Golf Club Calls Police on Black Women Members for Allegedly Playing Too Slow

The five women, one a local NAACP president, say it's a clear case of racial and gender discrimination.

Myneca Ojo / FACEBOOK

Five Black women, members of the Grandview Golf Club in Braddock, the oldest public golf course in York County, Pa., decided to meet on Saturday for a round of golf. The outing ended with the club co-owner, who is white, calling the police on the only Black, female players on the course because they allegedly played too slow and did not want to cancel their membership and leave.

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