Diddy Wet the Bed! How Did He Stop? [VIDEO]

Hip-hop mogul joins war on sugar, turns an embarrassing confession into anti-junk-food advocacy.

Not convinced that sugar could be a culprit behind increasing obesity and health disparities? Hip-hop mogul Sean "Diddy" Combs' recent confession on The Ellen DeGeneres Show should change your mind about junk food's perils.


Diddy told DeGeneres and the audience that he didn't drink water as a child. "I grew up as a Kool-Aid kid. I used to pour a half a pound of sugar into the Kool-Aid. Besides it having me bouncing off the walls, I used to be a bed wetter. ... There is something about sugar that makes you wet the bed."

He added: "So to all you boys and girls out there ... I'm telling you to drink water, OK? It'll stop you from wetting the bed."

While you can argue that Diddy's embarrassing declaration could be just a carefully spun PR strategy as part of a relaunch of AQUAhydrate water (he and actor Mark Wahlberg are part owners of the company), local governments aren't ignoring the evidence behind Diddy's claims.

Thirty-nine states already tax the purchase of sugary drinks, and additional taxes on candy and soda have been proposed in a handful of states—including Massachusetts, South Carolina, Florida and New York. Such taxes, argues New York City's Obesity Task Force, could result in a measurable reduction in obesity and health issues among Black and Latino populations, DiversityInc recently reported.

Resource groups can provide corporations valuable cultural-competence insights—such as health disparities and other concerns of specific demographic groups—and give a marketplace advantage. For more on how your company can leverage resource groups, watch this video presentation from Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation:  How Resource Groups Saved This Pharma $2 Million.

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