College President: Women Cry Rape After Sex Doesn't 'Turn Out the Way They Wanted'

By Chris Hoenig


Dr. Robert R. Jennings, President of Lincoln University, is under fire after saying he believes a lot of rape accusations are just made up because women regret consensual encounters.

Speaking at the school’s All Women’s Convocation, Jennings told Lincoln’s female students that men “treat women the way women allow us to treat them,” and that there are dangers in filing sexual-assault complaints.

“[We] had on this campus last semester three cases of young women, who after having done whatever they did with the young men, and then it didn’t turn out the way they wanted it to turn out, guess what they did They then went to Public Safety and said, ‘He raped me,'” Jennings told the audience. “So then we have to do an investigation. We have to start pulling back the layers and asking all kinds of questions. And when we start trying to collect the data and ask the questionsand why do we do that Because we know that possibly somebody’s life is getting ready to change for the rest of their life. Because there’s no more serious accusation.”

From there, Jennings appeared more concerned with the affect of rape allegations against the suspected rapist than with the mental, emotional and physical trauma experienced by the victim.

“I don’t care how close they are to finishing the degree, their whole life changes overnight. Because they’re going to get a record. And that record is then going to follow them the rest of their life,” he said. “They’re going to be expelled from the university. It’s going to be very difficult for them to get into anybody else’s university, because they have to explain at the receiving institution why they were expelled from the institution they were expelled from.”

“It’s frightening,” said Los Angelesbased Reverend James Thomas, whose son is a junior at the university. “There had to have been at least one young lady in that room who had been the victim of sexual assault who had not reported it, and there was nothing that was said by the president that would have given any comfort.”

Lincoln University, located just outside of Philadelphia in Chester County, Pa., was founded as a private university in 1854 and was the first Historically Black University in the country to grant degrees. It became a public university in 1972.

Jennings started holding separate convocations for male and female students following his appointment as president in 2012. The annual conferences discuss behavior, dress, and health and safetyincluding, apparently, sexual encounters.

Marybeth Gasman, a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania, called the comments “disturbing, offensive and sexist in nature.”

“The president blames young women for being raped by saying that when they have sex with someone and regret the act, they then create a story to explain it,” Gasman said.

Jennings’ remarks come at a time when colleges are so inept at handling sexual assault investigations that many victims won’t come forward.

California enacted a new law this year that requires public colleges and universities to follow new guidelines for investigating alleged sexual assaults. As part of the law, clear, agreeing action”an affirmative, conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity”is the new measure of consent, meaning “yes means yes” replaces “no means no” in sexual-assault-allegation investigations.

The law is similar to the affirmative-consent guidelines adopted by The Ohio State University as part of a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. The agreement, which ended a federal investigation into the university’s habitual mishandling of sexual-assault allegations, drew the ire of conservative talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh, leading to controversial remarks of his own about rape.

“Seduction used to be an art. Now, of course, it’s ‘brutish’ and it’s ‘predatory,'” Limbaugh said on his radio show. “‘Consent must be freely given, can be withdrawn at any time, and the absence of no does not mean yes.’ How many guys, in your own experience with women, have learned that no means yes if you know how to spot it Are these not lawsuits waiting to happen”

In 2012, a Wisconsin state legislator also sparked controversy with similar commentary. While discussing a sexual-assault case against a high-school student, State Representative Roger Rivard said his father had always warned him that some girls “rape so easy” because of how quickly they’ll allege rape after consensual sex.

“He also told me one thing: ‘If you do [have premarital sex], just remember, consensual sex can turn into rape in an awful hurry,'” Rivard said. “Because all of a sudden a young lady gets pregnant and the parents are madder than a wet hen and she’s not going to say, ‘Oh, yeah, I was part of the program.’ All that she has to say or the parents have to say is it was rape because she’s underage. And he just said, ‘Remember, Roger, if you go down that road, some girls,’ he said, ‘they rape so easy.’

“What the whole genesis of it was, it was advice to me, telling me, ‘If you’re going to go down that road, you may have consensual sex that night and then the next morning it may be rape.’ So the way he said it was, ‘Just remember, Roger, some girls, they rape so easy. It may be rape the next morning.'”

Just this past September, singer Cee Lo Green deleted his Twitter account after sending out a series of tweets trying to define “implied consent.”

“When someone brakes on a home there is broken glass,” he wrote. “Where is your plausible proof anyone was raped

“Women who have really been raped REMEMBER!!!” he added. “If someone is passed out they’re not even WITH you consciously! so WITH implies consent.”

The tweets came just days after Green pleaded no contest to spiking a dinner date’s drink with ecstasy in 2012. The woman said she woke up naked in her hotel room with Green with no recollection of what happened that night.

Green’s plea covered only the drug charges, as prosecutors said there wasn’t enough evidence to follow through on sexual-assault charges.

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