Subscribe

login / sign up

close and back to page

Latest News

Latest News

Update: Suspect Arrested, Charged in Jazmine Barnes' Killing

"At this time, investigators do not believe Jazmine's family was the intended target of the shooting," the Harris County Sheriff's Office said.

The Harris County Sheriff's Office said, in a statement early Sunday, that homicide investigators have filed a capital murder charge against Eric Black Jr., 20, for the shooting death of 7-year-old Jazmine Barnes in Texas.


"Investigators identified Black as a suspect based on a tip," states the sheriff's office. "Subsequent investigation revealed evidence that corroborated the tip, and Black was taken into custody in East Harris County without incident. Black then admitted to taking part in the shooting."

A second man, Larry Woodruffe, 24, has also been taken into custody, Lee Merritt, the Barnes family's lawyer, said. According to Merritt, Woodruffe is "believed to be the shooter."

The shooting occurred when Jazmine's mother was driving Jazmine and her three sisters southbound on the East Sam Houston Parkway feeder road near Wallisville Road on Dec. 30. The shooter opened fire into their car.

"At this time, investigators do not believe Jazmine's family was the intended target of the shooting, and that they were possibly shot as a result of mistaken identity," the sheriff's office said.

Both suspects in custody are Black, but on Thursday, police released a sketch of the suspected shooter who was believed to be a white man in his 30s or 40s.

Merritt addressed the shooter's description in an Instagram post on Sunday:

"Larry Woodruffe doesn't fit the description offered by the 4 different witness statements or composite sketch. Accordingly, this tip was difficult to believe.

"Assuming the confession elicited is reliable — it is possible the previously identified suspect seen fleeing by several independent witnesses was a bystander attempting to escape the shooting.

"To observers, however, he appeared to be the shooter himself. More information will have to be drawn out before there is a conviction."

Related Story: Reward Offered for Capture of Jazmine Barnes' Killer

Activist Shaun King, who offered a reward for the arrest of the perpetrator, said, on Twitter, that he provided the sheriff's office a tip leading to the men involved.

The Conversation (2)
Steve Butler08 Jan, 2019

good for you to report the trut

06 Jan, 2019

Jasmine , her family and the white guy were at the wrong place at the wrong time . Sad situation .

Viral Video of Daycare Employee Mistreating a Black Child Spurs Investigation

A Black toddler was subjected to having her hair pulled and being pushed by the employee.

My Little Playhouse Learning Center

In a video that has now gone viral on Instagram and Facebook, a woman is shown pushing and pulling the hair of a toddler at a daycare center.

Read More Show Less

Shutdown Over Border Wall Stops Over 42,000 Immigration Hearings in Their Tracks

"Largely, the individuals in the immigration courts and the ones getting their cases cancelled during the shutdown are on the lower end of the economic spectrum," said Alan Pollack, a New Jersey immigration attorney.

REUTERS

A report by Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse says that the tally of canceled immigration hearings, currently almost 43,000 for the shutdown period, would likely grow by 20,000 for each additional week the government fails to reopen.

Read More Show Less

Racist Uber Driver Caught on Video

A Uber ride turned into racist ranting.

Photo Courtesy of Kiara White

Kiara White, a Davenport, Iowa, resident, recorded a racist tirade by her driver while using the Uber ride service.

Read More Show Less

Rep. Steve King's White Supremacy Remark Just Shows His True Colors

King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse," tweeted Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) wants to know why white nationalists and white supremacists are getting a bad rep.

"White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?" King asked in an interview with The New York Times published on Thursday. "Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?"

The far-right lawmaker is at the forefront of supporting the Trump administration's anti-immigration policies and the push to end birthright citizenship. As a matter of fact, King credits himself with getting Trump onboard.

"Donald Trump came to Iowa as a real non-ideological candidate," King said, in the Times interview. He said he told Trump, "I market-tested your immigration policy for 14 years, and that ought to be worth something."

King has previously, on the House floor, shown a model of a 12-foot border wall he had designed.

Thursday afternoon he released a statement on Twitter "clarify" his comments on white supremacy and white nationalism.

"I want to make one thing abundantly clear; I reject those labels and the evil ideology" represented by those terms. "I am simply a Nationalist," he wrote.

"I condemn anyone that supports this evil and bigoted ideology which saw in its ultimate expression the systematic murder of 6 million innocent Jewish lives." Like the Founding Fathers, he wrote, "I am an advocate for Western Civilization's values."

But let's look at King's track record.

In the wake of the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre, consumers and employees pushed back against companies donating to King's campaign in November. He is known for his association with white nationalists, even retweeting a Nazi sympathizer.

(But residents of Iowa still re-elected him for another term.)

King endorsed, Faith Goldy, an openly white supremacist candidate for mayor of Toronto. He often praises far-right politicians and groups in other countries.

In September, during a European trip financed by From the Depths — a Holocaust memorial group — King actually met with members of a far-right Austrian party with historical ties to Nazis for an interview on their anti-Semitic propaganda website. The meeting was just a day after ending a five-day trip to Jewish and Holocaust historical sites in Poland, including the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp.

"In an interview with a website associated with the party, King declared that 'Western civilization is on the decline,' spoke of the replacement of white Europeans by immigrants and criticized Hungarian American financier George Soros, who has backed liberal groups around the world," according to The Washington Post.

In December 2017, King shared a story on Twitter written by the Voice of Europe and quoted Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, who said, "Mixing cultures will not lead to a higher quality of life but a lower one."

King added to the tweet: "Diversity is not our strength."

Members of Congress are condemning his recent comments.

"Everything about white supremacy and white nationalism goes against who we are as a nation," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, (R-Calif.), said, in a statement. "Steve's language is reckless, wrong, and has no place in our society. The Declaration of Independence states that 'all men are created equal.' That is a fact. It is self-evident."

Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney tweeted that King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse."

"Dear Steve King (@SteveKingIA): FYI this is one reason you get bad search results when people type your name in Google," Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), tweeted.

White Woman Says Her African Daughters Experienced 'Worst Racism' From Blacks

A clueless mother and "educator" writes about teaching her African daughters not to "see color."

Twitter

A writer for the Federalist, a conservative publication that uses tags in its stories like "Black Crime" to catalog incidents, and defended Roy Moore dating teenagers, wrote a story about her African adopted daughters not being Black girls, but Americans.

Read More Show Less

Judge Decreases Charlottesville Attacker's Sentence From 20 Years to Less Than Four

Daniel Borden, a white man, beat DeAndre Harris, a Black man, with a wooden plank, but Judge Richard Moore decided he's too young to serve the full sentence.

Twitter

Local media in Daniel Borden's hometown of Maumee, Ohio, said that he was known for his swastika drawings and Nazi salutes in high school. In 2017, at 18 years old, he traveled to the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville where he proceeded to beat DeAndre Harris, a Black man, leaving him with eight staples in his head, a broken wrist and cuts and bruises.

His weapon of choice: a six-foot wooden plank.

Read More Show Less