Logo Courtesy of EY

Bridget Neill named EY Americas Vice Chair – Public Policy, Will Succeed Policy Veteran Les Brorsen

Originally Published by EY.

Ernst & Young LLP (EY) announced that Bridget Neill has been named the EY Americas Vice Chair – Public Policy, effective July 1, 2019.

Neill joined EY 10 years ago following a career dedicated to financial regulatory policy, which included roles at the Federal Reserve, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Treasury, and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). For the past several years, she has worked alongside current Americas Vice Chair – Public Policy Les Brorsen as EY Americas Deputy Vice Chair – Public Policy, as well as on global public policy matters.

“Bridget is a veteran policy strategist and former regulator who knows how to get results through productive engagement with policymakers and other stakeholders,” said Kelly Grier, EY US Chairman and Managing Partner and Americas Managing Partner. “Bridget has devoted her career to collaborating with stakeholders around the world to develop balanced public policy that bolsters capital markets and protects investors.”

Neill earned a master’s degree from the Georgetown University School of Public Policy and a Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University.

Brorsen, the current EY Americas Vice Chair – Public Policy, has decided to retire on June 30, after a distinguished 22-year career with EY and more than 35 years in Washington political and policy roles.

“Les’ impactful leadership as the Americas Vice Chair – Public Policy has helped EY and the accounting profession navigate change and challenges such as the transition to independent audit oversight,” said Grier. “Les also played a critical role in leading the profession’s policy response and engagement after the financial crisis and positioning EY during shifts in the political landscape.”

Brorsen began his Washington career as an intern and agriculture aide to U.S. Senator Don Nickles (R-OK), and served as chief of staff for most of his 13 years with Nickles between 1984 and 1997. He joined EY in 1997 to lead EY’s US lobbying efforts and leaves behind a role covering public policy matters impacting business across North and South America.

“EY and the profession do great things for the economy and people,” Brorsen said. “It has been a privilege to work over the past two decades with so many great people who are committed to helping others in business and in life.”

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