BREAKING NEWS: LGBT Couples in Some States Win, Others Lose as Supreme Court Won't Decide Same-Gender Marriage …Yet

By Julissa Catalan


Photo by Shutterstock

The U.S. Supreme Court has will not hear same-gender marriage appeals from five statesIndiana, Oklahoma, Virginia, Wisconsin and Utahallowing members of the LGBT community to marry in those states, where same-gender marriage previously was banned.

Another six statesColorado, Kansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia and Wyomingare under the same federal-appeals-court jurisdiction as those five, meaning the SCOTUS decision is likely to bring the number of states where same-gender marriage is legal or faces few legal roadblocks from 19 to 30, plus the District of Colombia.

The cases before the Supreme Court included proceedings from three federal appeals courts:

a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit ruled 2-1 in June and July that same-gender couples in Utah and Oklahoma have “the same fundamental right” to marry as heterosexuals;

a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled 2-1 in July that gays and lesbians have a constitutional right to marry that is paramount to state marriage laws;

a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit declared unanimously last month that same-gender marriage bans in Indiana and Wisconsin threaten “the welfare of American children.”

This decision comes as a surprise to some legal experts, as the Supreme Court was expected to rule on whether same-gender marriage bans are unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court justices did not release any explanation for the decision not to hear the appeals.

While many are calling the Supreme Court ruling a reflection of public opinion, state officials against same-gender marriage defend their respective bans by arguing that the Constitution does not dictate how each state should define marriage and that there has never been a legal tradition that supports same-gender marriage.

“Any time same-sex couples are extended marriage equality is something to celebrate, and today is a joyous day for thousands of couples across America who will immediately feel the impact of today’s Supreme Court action,” said Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin. “But let me be clear, the complex and discriminatory patchwork of marriage laws that was prolonged today by the Supreme Court is unsustainable. The only acceptable solution is nationwide marriage equality and we recommit to ourselves to securing that ultimate victory as soon as possible.”

Last June, SCOTUS ruled 5-4 in the U.S. v Windsor case, eliminating a key part of federal law that had defined marriage as “only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.”

Appeals courts in Cincinnati and San Francisco are currently considering cases that could bring the number of states even higher, provided that Supreme Court rulings continue on this path.

Judges in the Cincinnati-based 6th Circuit will make rulings for Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee, while San Francisco’s 9th Circuit judges will consider Idaho’s and Nevada’s restrictions on same-gender marriage. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also holds jurisdiction over California, Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Montana, Oregon and Washington, as well as U.S. territories in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Latest News

Southern Company: Georgia Natural Gas Opens 10th Annual TrueBlue Community Awards Call for Entries

Originally published on southerncompany.com. Honor recognizes nonprofits supporting Georgia during COVID-19 and distributes grants to sustain continued efforts Georgia Natural Gas (GNG), Georgia’s leading natural gas provider, announces the call for entries for the 10th Annual TrueBlue Community Awards. This year, the awards will recognize hardworking Georgia nonprofits for their service providing COVID-19 relief…

Cori Bush

Multiple Congressmen ‘Accidentally’ Called Cori Bush, Missouri’s New Representative, ‘Breonna’; American Medical Association Classifies Racism as a Threat to Public Health; and More

Multiple congressmen “accidentally” called Missouri’s new representative Cori Bush  “Breonna” during Capitol event. Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush said she was stunned and hurt on the evening of Nov. 16, after a number of different Republicans called her “Breonna” during a new member orientation at the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Bush, who…

transgender, election

Meet 6 Transgender and Gender-Nonbinary Politicians Who Broke Ground in 2020

Despite the fraught nature of the 2020 presidential election results, victories at state levels put at least six transgender and nonbinary individuals in legislative positions. These small but significant gains for transgender visibility in politics came just before Transgender Awareness Week, which celebrates transgender people from Nov. 13–19 before Transgender…

Roger Ferguson to Retire as President and CEO of TIAA

Originally published on tiaa.org. TIAA, a leading provider of secure retirements and outcome-focused investment solutions to millions of people and thousands of institutions, said Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., intends to retire as President and CEO on March 31, 2021. The company’s Board and Mr. Ferguson believe it is an appropriate…

Justice Samuel Alito

Justice Samuel Alito Delivers Series of Highly Alarming Partisan Remarks; Racism Impairs Brain Performance, and More

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito delivers an alarming series of homophobic, partisan remarks. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito rarely makes public appearances, but when he does he apparently wants to make them count, being as irksome and controversial as possible — and completely disregarding the usual ethics required of judges…

Hershey: Leading With Empathy and Connection

Originally published on thehersheycompany.com by Katrina J. Briddell Manager, Global Sustainability & Social Impact There’s no denying: it’s been a tough year for everyone around the world. Here in the U.S., we’ve faced an unrelenting pandemic, mass movements for racial justice, raging wildfires, devastating hurricanes, and an election cycle that…