BREAKING NEWS: Freddie Gray's Death Ruled a Homicide

By Michael Nam


(Update: 1:31 p.m. 5/1/2015)

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake of Baltimore in a press conference stated that five of the police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray have been taken into custody.

Here is the list of charges from the state’s attorney’s office for the six police officers.

Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr.

Second degree depraved heart murder

Manslaughter (involuntary)

Assault/second degree

Manslaughter by vehicle (gross negligence)

Manslaughter by vehicle (criminal negligence)

Misconduct in office

Officer William G. Porter

Manslaughter (involuntary)

Assault/second degree

Misconduct in office

Lt. Brian W. Rice

Manslaughter (involuntary)

Assault/second degree

Assault/second degree

Misconduct in office

Misconduct in office

False imprisonment

Officer Edward M. Nero

Assault/second degree

Assault/second degree

Misconduct in office

Misconduct in office

False imprisonment

Officer Garrett E. Miller

Assault/second degree

Assault/second degree

Misconduct in office

Misconduct in office

False imprisonment

Sgt. Alicia D. White

Manslaughter

Assault/second degree

Misconduct in office

(Update: 11:06 a.m. 5/1/2015)

In a press conference State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced homicide charges and arrest warrants for the six officers suspected in the death of Freddie Gray.

(Update: 10:32 a.m. 5/1/2015)

The man who recorded the arrest of Freddie Gray, Kevin Moore, had allegedly been arrested himselfduring Thursday night protests, according toThinkProgress.

Shortly after his release, Moore detailed the events leading up to his arrest, in a webcast discussion with Photography Is Not a Crime’s Carlos Miller. Moore says he was protesting with Ferguson cop watchers on North Avenue, shouting obscenities and wearing an Anonymous mask. Once the group left, officers arrested them without issuing a citation or explaining what the charges were. He was released later that night.

ThinkProgress described the arrest as suspicious. The detainment of Kevin Moore also echoes the similar situation of Ramsey Orta, the man who recorded the choking death of Eric Garner at the hands of the NYPD. Orta himself was arrested and kept on Riker’s Island under suspicious circumstances after the release of the horrific video.

Regarding horrific police tactics, The New York Times reports that the type of injuries leaking to the media from police sources could be consistent with the brutal practice called the “rough ride”. The abusive tradition has police officers transporting suspects in extendedrides (consistent with the timeline of events for Freddie Gray’s arrest) where the arrested individual would be left unharnessed while the driver would erratically speed, stop suddenly and make sharp turns to injure the suspect.

The leaked information regarding the injury to the back of Gray’s head as well as the seriously damaged spine may be consistent with such activity.

In Philadelphia, where the arrest tactic is known as the “nickel ride”, protesters found themselves in a confrontation with police during an alleged attempts by the demonstrators to block highways and street, according to CNN.

The protest began at city hall before moving outwards after the area filled with people much like the New York City protests that began in Union Square on Wednesday night. —————- As the city of Baltimore finds itself in a period of relative calm following an imposed curfew and the arrival of the National Guard, reports of two separate leaks on the day the Baltimore police investigation into the death of Freddie Gray in police was delivered to the office of the Maryland state’s attorney appears to be suspiciously timed. According to a report by WJLA-TV, sources who have seen the findings state that the injury that killed him, the broken spine, was caused by his body being slammed into the back of the van, and that it was not caused during his arrest. “Details surrounding exactly what caused Gray to slam into the back of the van was unclear,” the news station added. “While we have and will continue to leverage the information received by the Department, we are not relying solely on their findings but rather the facts that we have gathered and verified,” said State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby in a statement. “We ask for the public to remain patient and peaceful and to trust the process of the justice system.” Trusting the process becomes far more difficult afterthe Washington Post’s publication of an account the day prior, based on police documents, implying that Freddie Gray injured himself during his arrest:

A prisoner sharing a police transport van with Freddie Gray told investigators that he could hear Gray “banging against the walls” of the vehicle and believed that he “was intentionally trying to injure himself.”

As the DailyKos points out, the document, which suspiciously favors the accused police officers, contradicts the assertion Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. WBAL-TV reporter Jayne Miller took to Twitter to point out this conflict.

With conflicting reports dribbling out and how less than forthcoming the police have been in releasing any information regarding the case previously, the timing of the WJLA report and the Washington Post’s story lend themselves to a great deal of skepticism. The continuing erosion of trust is understandable as the police also revealed many days later that the van carrying Gray made an unannounced stop, according to WBAL-TV:

At the same press conference, Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis revealed for the first time that there was a fourth stop made between the time Gray was placed in the transport van and when he arrived at the police department’s Western District building.

With the state’s ongoing investigation coupled with distrust for authorities handling the matter, solidarity and protesting continue to grow online and in cities across the nation.

Thousands took part in demonstrations in cities across the country from New York to Oakland in solidarity. Protesters in New York City faced a police force seemingly more aggressive than in previous demonstrations for Ferguson and Eric Garner, as multiple arrests were made amidst accusations of abuse.

While vandalism and violence continue to dominate the headlines, the question of what happened to Freddie Gray remains unanswered. Despite the Baltimore Police’s behavior during the riots, including the arrest and misgendered incarceration of a trans woman as well as the recorded abrupt arrest of a peaceful protester, the outrage and desire for justice continues.

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