AT&T: FirstNet Momentum: More Than 2,500 Public Safety Agencies Subscribed

Originally Published by AT&T.

More than 2,500 public safety agencies across the country have joined FirstNet. This is nearly double the number of agencies since the last update in July.


FirstNet is the nationwide public safety communications platform dedicated to America’s first responders. Being built with AT&T*, in public-private partnership with the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority), FirstNet is bringing public safety a much-needed technology upgrade to help them connect to the critical information they need. Every day. And in every emergency.

“We’ve recently seen a spike in the number of public safety agencies subscribing to FirstNet,” said Chris Sambar, senior vice president, AT&T-FirstNet. “FirstNet is designed for every first responder in the country for both their agency provided and their personal device. It offers enhanced security on a dedicated network that prioritizes first responder communications. And it doesn’t throttle. So, we’re calling all first responders to join their network and benefit from the technology, terms and conditions that are purpose-built to favor the important work they do.”

The more than 150,000 FirstNet connections are helping first responders nationwide transform their emergency response. Subscribers benefit from enhanced connectivity in remote locations, near real-time data sharing and improved situational awareness.

“Our crews have been battling a number of wildfires across the state of Oregon. And during each, FirstNet has proved its value as public safety’s network platform,” said Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Chief Mike Duyck. “From boosting communications at base camp during our response to the Miles Fire to connecting our firefighters on the front line of the Ramsey Canyon Fire, we’ve been able to count on our FirstNet service to elevate our ability to effectively and efficiently achieve our mission.”

First responders battling a wildfire, treating patients at the scene of an accident or trying to apprehend an active shooter don’t have time to worry about their network connection. They just need it to work, so they can reliably communicate and coordinate their response. That’s why FirstNet was created.

First responders on FirstNet get access to:

  • Affordable solutions without the concern of being throttled anywhere in the country.
  • Always-on priority and preemption across voice and data to stay connected despite network congestion.
  • Increased coverage and capacity through FirstNet’s Band 14 build, giving first responders greater access to the connectivity they need, where they need it.
  • Innovative applications and devices specifically certified for public safety.
  • Dedicated care for additional support as needed.

“We’ll continue to work side-by-side with the public safety community and AT&T to ensure FirstNet delivers for them today and for years to come,” said FirstNet Authority CEO Mike Poth.

For more about the value FirstNet is bringing to public safety, check out FirstNet.com.

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