In Places Where Blacks Predominate, Can They Be Racist?

Question: Amazing. You said blacks can't be racist towards whites in the USA. What would you call the attacks on the white girls in California by a group of blacks recently? What about areas, like cities, where blacks predominate? Can the powers that be, the blacks in this case, be racist? And if race is based on hierarchy in the U.S. as you said, it is assumed you meant whites were at the top. Is this not a racist statement?

Luke Visconti's Ask the White Guy column is a top draw on DiversityInc.com. Visconti, the founder and CEO of DiversityInc, is a nationally recognized leader in diversity management. In his popular column, readers who ask Visconti tough questions about race/culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability and age can expect smart, direct and disarmingly frank answers.


Question:

Amazing. You said blacks can't be racist towards whites in the USA.  What would you call the attacks on the white girls in California by a group of blacks recently?

What about areas, like cities, where blacks predominate? Can the powers that be, the blacks in this case, be racist?

And if race is based on hierarchy in the U.S. as you said, it is assumed you meant whites were at the top. Is this not a racist statement?

Answer:

By any measurement of economic and political power, whites dominate our society.

Therefore, black people can be bigots, homophobes, misogynists or haters of any other group, but they can't be racist.

I'm done with this subject; this last post will serve as an answer to all the angry people who e-mailed me, including the guy who quoted Webster (who was a white guy, too).

 

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At the 2018 DiversityInc Top 50 event, more than 400 people were in attendance during the day to hear best practices on effectively managing diversity and inclusion.

Moderator: Luke Visconti, CEO, DiversityInc

Panelists:

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Luke Visconti is the founder and CEO of DiversityInc. Although the title of his column is meant to be humorous, the issues he addresses and the answers he gives to questions are serious — and based on his 18 years of experience publishing DiversityInc. Click here to send your own question to Luke.

We will be deluged by Martin Luther King articles and columns today. Some will be excellent, like the one Rev. Jesse Jackson wrote. But most will be saccharine sweet and not say what needs to be said.

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