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Abbott: Tech Knowledge on Neuromodulation

This video discusses neuromodulation and deep brain stimulation where scientists use electrical stimulation to disrupt — or modulate — signals in the body to treat the symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

Tech Knowledge is an online video series about Abbott innovations.

Imagine going from complete independence — where you like, when you like, how you like — to being unable to control your arms to brush your own teeth. It can be crushing, mentally and emotionally.

For many people living with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor that disruption of their daily lives is a stark reality. Enter neuromodulation and deep brain stimulation where scientists use electrical stimulation to disrupt — or modulate — signals in the body to treat the symptoms of movement disorders.


Lorena meets Brittany, who introduces her to our Infinity DBS system equipped with directional lead technology. The leads allow more precise stimulation to maximize care while reducing unwanted side effects, all within reach via an iOS device. All within reach. For people diagnosed with Parkinson's and ET, those are words of sweet relief.

*There is no cure for Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor (ET), but there are options available to treat symptoms. The first-line therapy is medication. Surgical treatments are also available. It's important to discuss with your doctor what's right for you along with the risks and side effects of each option, such as motor fluctuations or permanent neurological impairment. As with any surgery or therapy, deep brain stimulation has risks and complications.

Most side effects of DBS surgery are temporary and correct themselves over time. Some people may experience lasting, stroke-like symptoms, such as weakness, numbness, problems with vision or slurred speech. In the event that the side effects are intolerable or you are not satisfied with the therapy, the DBS system can be turned off or surgically removed. Risks of brain surgery include serious complications such as coma, bleeding inside the brain, paralysis, seizures and infection. Some of these may be fatal.

Bayer's Damion Jones Addresses Intersectionality and How to Find Common Ground with Peers

"If we can connect well, we can collaborate well, and if we can collaborate well we can innovate well as an organization," says Jones, Global Director of Inclusion and Diversity for Bayer U.S.

'We Want Transparency, Not Cover-Up": Jesse Jackson Gave Eulogy for Alabama Man Killed by Cops

Following the funeral of Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., a press conference on Monday called for justice as forensics revealed he was shot in the back.

Screenshot from WBRC broadcast

Over 1,000 people were in attendance at Boutwell Memorial Auditorium in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday to mourn Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr. and demand justice regarding his police-related death. Rev. Jesse L. Jackson Sr. accompanied the family and delivered the eulogy.

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Toyotathon Returns Home For The Holidays With Heartwarming New Ad

A service member is welcomed home with a special greeting in Toyota's latest spot.

Originally Published by Toyota Motor North America.

Toyotathon is back for its 39th year with a holiday spot that showcases a heartwarming homecoming. The 90-second "Home for the Holidays" spot premiered Wednesday night, November 28th, on NBC's primetime Christmas in Rockefeller Center, with a throw from NBC's TODAY Host Al Roker.

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AT&T: 25 Years Later, You Will

We've brought together the people who worked on this campaign to recall their vision back in 1993. And we've also gathered AT&T experts and futurists to predict what 25 years from now may look like.

Originally Published by AT&T.

Twenty-five years ago, we dared people to imagine a world where you could take a meeting from the beach, talk to someone through your watch, and even get directions from your car's dashboard.

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A Black Father Pushes Congress to Save the Lives of Black Mothers

Charles Johnson lost his wife post childbirth and he's fighting to make sure no more Black women die from poor post-natal care.

Screenshot from YOUTUBE

Charles Johnson IV posted on Instagram Thursday morning that the final deadline in getting Congress to pass the Preventing Maternal Deaths Act is next week.

Johnson, a Los Angeles resident, has been fighting for Black mothers like his wife, Kira. She died in 2016 in a hospital that left her bleeding internally for 10 hours without a CT scan after giving birth to their second child. Medical professionals had told Johnson, who was pleading for help for his wife, that she "wasn't a priority" for them.

Johnson and his mother, TV judge Glenda Hatchett, are advocating for Black women, as they are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes as their white counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Johnson and his two sons are also plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the hospital and several doctors alleging wrongful death and negligent infliction of emotional distress.

Kira Johnson died of "hemorrhagic shock due to acute hemoperitoneum," which the lawsuit said doctors failed to properly diagnose and treat.

Black women including, Serena Williams, have put the alarming statistics into perspective. Williams demanded a CT scan after giving birth to her daughter, Olympia, when she felt short of breath. A nurse had told her she was confused because of her pain medication, but Williams was persistent and it ended up saving her life.

Johnson formed 4Kira4Moms, a nonprofit dedicated to honor Kira's life and to prevent other families from experiencing unnecessary birth-related deaths.

Johnson and Hatchett, recently participated in a congressional briefing on maternal mortality hosted by the Reproductive Justice Initiative.

"They did nothing to correct it in a timely manner," Hatchett said.

"This is a woman who would be alive today had it not been for, what we say in the complaint, medical negligence. One minute we're at the hospital celebrating [the couple's] second son's birth, just a very joyous time and then hours later, she's gone…"

His testimony to Congress in September was followed by Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-MA) who read of the jarring statistics that Black women are 243% more likely to die from pregnancy or childbirth-related complications than white women.

The hospital's statement released TWO YEARS AFTER Kira's death:

"Kira Johnson's death was a tragedy. Her husband, Charles S. Johnson IV, and his mother, Judge Glenda Hatchett, are demonstrating important leadership in raising awareness of preventable maternal deaths. Cedars-Sinai strongly agrees with Judge Hatchett and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that no mother should die giving birth."

"Based on our findings, we make any changes that are needed so that we can continue to provide the highest quality care to our patients. This includes reviewing hospital procedures as well as the competency of healthcare providers. Among other changes, we have updated processes for post-anesthesia care and have increased simulation training for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals related to care of hospitalized obstetric patients."


Charles Johnson shares the tragic story of his wife Kira's death hours after giving birth. www.youtube.com

Reader Question: Do you know any women who have experienced discrimination in medical care post child birth?

'Hurts Like Crazy': Jemel Roberson's Mother on the Death of Her Son

The choir at his funeral wore black T-shirts with "SECURITY, #Justice For Jemel" printed on front.

Screenshot of CBS Chicago broadcast

Beatrice Roberson, the mother of Jemel Roberson, a security guard who was shot and killed by Midloathian police after detaining a shooter at a bar, said her son "died doing what he loved," and that the loss "hurts like crazy."

"He was a good person, he had a good heart," she said during his funeral at House of Hope.

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Trial Begins for Cops Charged With Covering Up Laquan McDonald's Death

They are the first Chicago officers to face criminal "code of silence" charges.

Screenshot from ABC 7 Chicago

The trial of former Detective David March and former Officers Joseph Walsh and Thomas Gaffney of the Chicago Police Department begins today. The men are charged with conspiracy, obstruction of justice and misconduct in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

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