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'We Want Transparency, Not Cover-Up": Jesse Jackson Gave Eulogy for Alabama Man Killed by Cops

Following the funeral of Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., a press conference on Monday called for justice as forensics revealed he was shot in the back.

Screenshot from WBRC broadcast

Over 1,000 people were in attendance at Boutwell Memorial Auditorium in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday to mourn Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr. and demand justice regarding his police-related death. Rev. Jesse L. Jackson Sr. accompanied the family and delivered the eulogy.


"Say," Jackson instructed the mourners, "We will have the tape made public."

They repeated his words.

"We want transparency, not cover-up," said Jackson. "Tell the whole story. Tell it now. We want justice now."

He spoke of the long history of civil rights in Birmingham, and mentioned the current Black Lives Matter movement as well as Black males killed by police.

Jackson said Bradford joined "the victims of racial violence across the U.S."

"The list of victims of this sickness of uncontrolled violence fueled by racism and political indifference is much too long," he said. "The officer who took Emantic's life and snuffed out his dream must face justice."

"Innocent blood has power," Jackson said.

Bradford was shot and killed by police prior to Black Friday at the Riverchase Galleria shopping mall in Hoover, Ala., after initially being the suspect of a shooting the same night that injured two people. He was actually trying to save people from the shooter.

Emantic Bradford Sr. spoke of how his son changed when he was diagnosed with cancer: "When I got sick, I knew then my son turned the corner and started being responsible," said Bradford Sr. "The shoe was on the other foot. He started checking on me. My child was a good child."

"Even a young Black man with no criminal record serving as a caregiver for his father is still a threat," Jackson said. He described the shooting as the "violent death of another innocent son wrapped in black skin."

In a press conference shortly before noon on Monday where Benjamin Crump revealed the medical review of Bradford's body, Jackson echoed his sentiments on the need for transparency, fairness and justice now.

"Do not diminish the moral authority of EJ," he said directed to law enforcement authorities. "Don't embarrass the family. Don't make any act that undermines the legal process."

The forensic results showed Bradford was shot three times in the back while he was running away. "Each shot was a kill shot," Jackson said. "Three shots and a cover-up. The longer there is a sense of cover-up, there is a sense of protest."

He continued his comments to those activists that are protesting, just as a long line of activists before them: "Protest mightily and nonviolently. Do not let the actions discredit the victim."


In an interview prior to the funeral, the Reverend blamed Trump for the culture of division and a lack of national policy regarding the release of body cam video.

"It's tough when the president is a white nationalist. They're fighting for nationalist power." Jackson also said these are "officers of the state" that are killing Black men.

"The killing of Bradford must be a source of strength do not fight fire with fire. We must never forget Bradford… We must never surrender in the face of this dark hour."

Reader Question: Since Bradford was shot in the back while moving away from officers, do you think criminal charges will be filed against police?

Laquan McDonald Reduced to 'Second Class Citizen,' Says Family

The light sentence given to the officer who killed McDonald, "suggests to us that there are no laws on the books for a Black man that a white man is bound to honor," said his great-uncle.

Hours of testimony at Jason Van Dyke's sentencing on Friday ended in shock for one family, and relief and happiness for the other.

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Senator Holds Airlines Accountable When Servicing Customers With Disabilities

U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) is working to stop wheelchairs from getting damaged during air travel.

TWITTER

U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) is leading the charge for better airline management of customers' motorized wheelchairs. Duckworth has been confined to a wheelchair since her helicopter was shot down in Iraq and she lost both of her legs.

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California Defies Trump's Order NOT to Pay Furloughed Workers Unemployment

Over 55 percent of civil service employees in the state are people of color.

Screenshot from ABC 7

President Donald Trump signed legislation on Wednesday that said all furloughed workers would receive back pay once the government reopens. However, the Trump administration has ordered states not to provide unemployment coverage to federal workers who have been required to work without pay during the partial government shutdown.

California Governor Gavin Newsom said on Thursday the U.S. Department of Labor sent states a letter with that mandate, according to NPR. The Department of Labor said the roughly 420,000 federal employees who are "essential" cannot file for unemployment as they are "generally ineligible."

It also reported 10,454 initial claims by federal workers for the week that ended Jan. 5, doubling the previous week's figure. Thousands more have applied since, state officials said.

Newsom said the decision by the Department of Labor's decision was "jaw-dropping."

"So, the good news is, we're going to do it, and shame on them," he said.

"From a moral perspective, there is no debate on this issue and we will blow back aggressively on the Department of Labor."

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) reports unemployment claims for one week during the shutdown are up 600 percent from the same time last year. The state has over 245,000 federal employees.

Over 55 percent of civil service employees in the state are people of color, and they are over 35 percent of the country's federal workforce.

Newsom encouraged people to continue to apply while the state figured out how to get the money. He estimated benefits that would last up to 26 weeks and provided a few hundred extra dollars a month. He said he knows it doesn't fix everything, but hopefully it helps.

His message to Trump: "Let us states do the job you can't seem to do yourself."

Some state officials said they had asked utilities and other companies to extend mercy to federal employees, and the federal Office of Personnel Management published sample letters that furloughed employees could send to creditors to ask for patience.

Texas has received more than 2,900 claims from federal workers since the shutdown began on Dec. 22, while Ohio is approaching 700. Kansas reported 445 filings, and Alabama was closing in on 500. Montana said it had logged almost 1,500.

Trump tweeted on Friday that he would be making a "major announcement" on Saturday about the government shutdown.

A senior administration official told CNN that Trump plans to offer Democrats another proposal to end the shutdown.

Reader Question: How are people you know that are furloughed workers surviving?

Southern Company: Stay Safe, Warm and Save Money as Temperatures Drop

Southern Company's Georgia Power offers tips to help customers as winter weather sets in.

Originally Published by Southern Company.

As winter temperatures begin to drop, Georgia Power encourages customers to keep safety in mind and offers safety tips to help prevent electrical fires.

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Black Student in Kansas Sues School District for Racial Discrimination

The dance team's choreographer told Camille Sturdivant that her skin was "too dark" to perform because she "clashed" with uniforms.

Camille Sturdivant has filed a racial discrimination lawsuit against the Blue Valley School District for the abuse she was subjected to as a member of the high school dance team.

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Viral Video of Daycare Employee Mistreating a Black Child Spurs Investigation

A Black toddler was subjected to having her hair pulled and being pushed by the employee.

My Little Playhouse Learning Center

In a video that has now gone viral on Instagram and Facebook, a woman is shown pushing and pulling the hair of a toddler at a daycare center.

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