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Trump Says of Aid to Puerto Rico: 'Incredibly Successful' Storm Response

"If he thinks the death of 3,000 people is a success, God help us all," said Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan.

REUTERS

President Trump actually boasted on Tuesday about the shortcomings that killed 3,000 Puerto Ricans during, and after, Hurricane Maria last September.

He said that while the response to hurricanes in Texas and Florida got excellent grades, "I think that Puerto Rico was an incredible, unsung success."


Trump said the island is in a "tough" location due to the inability to transport equipment and supplies by truck.

"I actually think it is one of the best jobs that's ever been done with respect to what this is all about," he said of FEMA's response.

Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan, said on Twitter: "If he thinks the death of 3,000 people is a success, God help us all."

Cruz said to CNN: "In a humanitarian crisis, you should not be grading yourself. You should not be just having a parade of self-accolades. You should never be content with everything we did. I'm not content with everything I did, I should have done more. We should all have done more."

She continued, "But the president continues to refuse to acknowledge his responsibility."

FEMA acknowledged the shortcomings in a report released in July, including staff shortages, empty warehouses, insufficient equipment and no truck drivers to deliver aid from the port. FEMA lacked "situational awareness" with regards to infrastructure, including conditions of hospitals, roads, and wastewater facilities for almost a week.

They also rejected 97 percent of the requests to help financially with the funerals of people who died in Puerto Rico after the storm.

Just as Trump bragged, 10 Democrat senators and 14 congressmen sent a letter to FEMA's Brock Long, asking for him to specify their course of action in contacting those who requested but did not receive help.

"Please provide a summary of how the requests were resolved, and how many are pending," they wrote.

Trump lied about the electric grid as well, saying "when the storm hit, they had no electricity, essentially, before the storm," and that the grid was "largely closed."

Related Story: Puerto Rico Says Power Has Been Restored Completely, Residents Say Otherwise

Previous omissions of accurate death tolls have also been the subject of debate since Maria struck the island.

Jose Andrés, a Spanish chef who organized an emergency feeding program on the island after Maria, said:

"The death toll issue has been one of the biggest cover-ups in American history. Everybody needs to understand that the death toll was a massive failure by federal government and the White House. Not recognizing how many people died in the aftermath meant the resources and full power of the government was taken away from the American people of Puerto Rico."

Trump: "Puerto Rico was an incredible, unsung success"

AT&T: Distracted Driving on Two Wheels: A New Reality

Break the habit and take the pledge to end distracted driving in and out of the car at ItCanWait.com.

Originally Published by AT&T.

By Ryan Luckey, Assistant Vice President, Corporate Brand Marketing

The roads can be a scary place. Drivers are taking their eyes off the road to look at their latest like, text or email.

And with the introduction of shared e-scooters, the latest in transportation innovation, it's more important than ever for riders and drivers to keep their eyes on the road.

One hand on the handlebar, another on the phone, then bam. You hit a pothole.

Tens of thousands of injuries – and hundreds of deaths – occur every year due to smartphone distracted driving. This is the unfortunate reality our AT&T It Can Wait program continues to address since 2010.

And now it's becoming clear smartphone distractions are no longer just a problem in the car.

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Update: Illinois Task Force Rushes to Release Details That Contradict 'Security' Hat Claim

Jemel Roberson family's attorney says the task force has a habit of not disciplining, firing, or criminally charging officers in police shootings.

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The Illinois State Police Public Integrity Task Force released a preliminary report less than three days after the shooting of Jemel Roberson, Black security guard in Robbins, Ill, which contradicted what witnesses and Roberson's family attorney have said.

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Marriott International Expands "Culture Day" Program Worldwide In 2018

Immersive trainings offer hotel staff and corporate customers deep dives into 13 cultures, underscoring company's aim to welcome all, elevate customer satisfaction and drive business; the newest culture days: Native American and LGBTQ.

REUTERS

Originally Published by Marriott International.

Marriott International announced the expansion of its groundbreaking Culture Day program aimed at fostering multicultural understanding to ensure welcoming environments at its hotels and increase guest satisfaction. Since Marriott founded the program in 2014, the company has hosted more than 50 Culture Day trainings in over 30 cities and eight countries. During 2018, demand for the program doubled as more hotels as well as corporate customers requested this training.

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For the second year in a row, GQ Magazine has selected a woman for its annual Man of the Year issue. Last year's cover featured Israeli-actress, Gal Gadot. The cover was light and cute. It could've been an advertisement for "The Women's March." This year, tennis-legend Serena Williams, won the "honor." Only her cover isn't a celebration of her athletic prowess and excellence. It's outright racist.

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Update: Black Security Guard Gunned Down by Police Was Wearing a 'SECURITY' Hat

Not only was he clearly identifiable, but officers on the scene knew Jemel Roberson. A civil rights lawsuit has been filed against "Officer John Doe" and Midloathian Village.

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Jemel Roberson, age 26, shot and killed on Sunday by a white cop in a Chicago suburb, was wearing a hat that said "SECURITY" on it, clearly identifying himself as an ally to the police.

Officers circled his body in video footage, after telling the unnamed officer, who is a four-year veteran of the force, that Roberson was "one of us."

The medical examiner in Cook County ruled Roberson's death a homicide by multiple gunshot wounds.

Beatrice Roberson, Jemel's mother, retained attorney Gregory Kulis who filed a civil rights lawsuit against "Officer John Doe" and the Village of Midloathian on Monday claiming the officer's actions were "intentional, willful and wanton" and that the shooting was "unprovoked," "unjustified" and "unreasonable."

"Jemel was trying to save people's lives," said Kulis. "He was working security. A shooting had just taken place inside the establishment. So he was doing his job and holding onto somebody until somebody arrived. And a police officer, it's our feeling didn't make the proper assessment and fired and killed Jemel."

Midloathian police expressed "heartfelt condolences" in a statement to the family.

Sherriff's office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari said the man shot by police, "turned out to be a guy working security for the bar."

Roberson was the father of a nine-month-old son with Avontea Boose, and was planning on getting an apartment for his family with his earnings from the job, according to Rev. Marvin Hunter, who also said Roberson was a promising keyboard player at several churches including his, and "an upstanding man."

Hunter is the great uncle of Laquan McDonald who was also killed by police in Chicago in 2014.

A vigil held outside Manny's on Monday was wrought with expressions of frustration, grief, and demands for action:

"Why? Why did you kill him?" Roberson's cousin, Candace Ousley asked. "It doesn't make sense. The police officer just saw a black man. I believe if he was indeed white, he'd be alive."

Another man at the vigil said, "This was not reckless policing, this was homicidal policing. They saw a black man with a gun. If he did not have a gun, his black skin made him a weapon.

"As a community, we demand respectful engagement. We want the police to treat our people with just a certain amount of dignity and respect. They patrol the Black community like some . . . Gestapo being judge, jury and executioner."

Another vigil attendee, Harvey Alderman Keith Price, called on State's Attorney Kim Foxx to open an investigation into the shooting.

"This could have been my son. This could have been any one of our sons," Price said. "So Kim Foxx, do the right thing, open up a full out investigation. That's what you got elected for."

Lane Tech College Prep, where Roberson graduated from, tweeted a remembrance of Roberson:

Related Story: Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Jemel Roberson Remembered By Friends www.youtube.com

Wisconsin Teens Throw Up Nazi Salute in Junior Prom Photo

Bigotry continues to thrive in a state that has no diversity.

A high school in Baraboo, Wisc., is currently under investigation after a picture of dozens white male students throwing up the Nazi salute at their junior prom was recently shared on Twitter.

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Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Police officers saw, Jemel Roberson, "a Black man with a gun, and basically killed him," said a witness.

WGN Screenshot

Jemel Roberson, age 26, was working as a security guard at Manny's Blue Room bar in Robbins, Ill., when a drunken patron who he had been asked to leave earlier, returned with a gun. The patron shot four people.

Roberson, who was armed at the time, returned fire, grabbed one of the men, held him down and waited for police to arrive, according to witnesses.

"He had somebody on the ground with his knee in back, with his gun in his back like, 'Don't move,'" Adam Harris told WGN-TV.

An unnamed Midloathian police officer, according to other officers in that department who were called to assist Robbins' police, opened fire on Roberson, killing him.

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#ShoppingWhileBlack: Maryland Couple Sues Costco for $4M

A routine trip to Costco turned into a case of racial profiling.

Courtesy of WBAL TV

Barbara and Bahri Wallace loved to shop at Costco. And this trip to the megastore should have been like every other trip. However, while the couple were shopping at the Costco in Anne Arundel County in Maryland in May, the husband and wife reported they were being watched by management.

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