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Update: Botham Jean Celebrated Amid the Urging of Officer Guyger to Come Clean

Many called for justice. One speaker at the funeral said: Botham Shem Jean was not a silhouette.

Thousands gathered Thursday afternoon to celebrate the life of Botham "Bo" Shem Jean in the sanctuary of Greenville Avenue Church of Christ in Richardson. But undertones of hurt, and a demand of justice for Jean, were present.

Many spoke of Jean's character and faith, and the family's rearing of an "exemplary student, mentor and teacher," but among the prayers and remarks were calls for justice.


The service comes at the time when many are poking holes in the claims of Amber Guyger — the officer who killed Jean in his own apartment.

Shaun King tweeted a video that showed that the change in the story from the apartment door being closed and unlocked first, and then open, was impossible because all the apartment doors in the building were automatically shut.

"To hear that his door was open, he would never and have the lights off, he would never do that," said Allisa Jean, Botham's sister, in an interview shortly after his death.

"One of the things I would like is for Amber to come clean. Just surrender," said Allison Jean, Botham's mother.

Justice was, in part, preached from the pulpit during a eulogy delivered by Sammie Berry from Dallas West Church of Christ.

"That apartment complex, the state, the city, the police department, the community… should take action," Berry said to a standing ovation.

"If we need to take action, protests should be peaceful. I say that because that was Botham. He would do it peacefully."

Botham's uncle, a politician in St. Lucia, described the news of his death as a "nuke that has been unleashed by someone charged to protect", and described the officer as having a "quick to trigger finger."

A family friend, Dane Felicien, who spoke charged all to love and not overreact with deadly force.

"Botham Shem Jean was not a silhouette," he said.

A standing ovation followed.

Jean received his bachelor's degree in business administration, accounting, and management information systems from Harding University in Searcy, Ark., according to his LinkedIn page.

He started as an intern at PwC, later becoming an employee.

PwC U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner Tim Ryan was present at the funeral and talked about the effect Jean had on 55,000 people around the globe and that they would stand with the family while they search for accountability:

Ryan said that Jean has inspired people to change their actions to live like he did, and that he is now a "spark to help others care more, put aside their differences, understand each others experience."

He additionally said that Botham was a hero, and a model for empathy and understanding, not violence.

"We stand with you as you find answers to why he was taken from us," Ryan said.

Jean began working at PwC full-time right after the police shootings of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling in July 2016, and the company held talks about race.

The PwC Foundation has contributed toward the cost of Jean's memorial service and the company will make a $50,000 contribution to a scholarship fund that Jean's family established in the 26-year-old's honor.

Representatives from the city of Dallas, including Mayor Mike Rawlings, County Judge Clay Jenkins, police chief Renee Hall, state representatives and senators were present at Jean's funeral as well.

Related Story: Dallas Police Department's Attempt to Demonize Murder Victim, Botham Jean, is Disgusting

Related Story: Update: Officer's Story of Shooting Botham Jean Contradicts Witnesses

Interview with Mother of Botham Jean

Fox 16 Little Rock, Ark. Interview with Mother of Botham Jean.

White Kansas Official Tells Black Women He Belongs to the 'Master Race': Video

Louis Klemp pointed to the gap in his teeth as proof. Kansas governor wants him to resign.

During a public commissioner meeting, a Leavenworth County commissioner, Louis Klemp, a white man, made "master race" comments to a Black woman.

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Jan Singer, CEO of Victoria's Secret lingerie division, is resigning from her position as the sales for the lingerie company continue to plummet. And shares of L Brands, its parent company, are also on the decline as it faces backlash for its white, male chief marketing officer's diversity fail.

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Update: Illinois Task Force Rushes to Release Details That Contradict 'Security' Hat Claim

Jemel Roberson family's attorney says the task force has a habit of not disciplining, firing, or criminally charging officers in police shootings.

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The Illinois State Police Public Integrity Task Force released a preliminary report less than three days after the shooting of Jemel Roberson, Black security guard in Robbins, Ill, which contradicted what witnesses and Roberson's family attorney have said.

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Update: Black Security Guard Gunned Down by Police Was Wearing a 'SECURITY' Hat

Not only was he clearly identifiable, but officers on the scene knew Jemel Roberson. A civil rights lawsuit has been filed against "Officer John Doe" and Midloathian Village.

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Jemel Roberson, age 26, shot and killed on Sunday by a white cop in a Chicago suburb, was wearing a hat that said "SECURITY" on it, clearly identifying himself as an ally to the police.

Officers circled his body in video footage, after telling the unnamed officer, who is a four-year veteran of the force, that Roberson was "one of us."

The medical examiner in Cook County ruled Roberson's death a homicide by multiple gunshot wounds.

Beatrice Roberson, Jemel's mother, retained attorney Gregory Kulis who filed a civil rights lawsuit against "Officer John Doe" and the Village of Midloathian on Monday claiming the officer's actions were "intentional, willful and wanton" and that the shooting was "unprovoked," "unjustified" and "unreasonable."

"Jemel was trying to save people's lives," said Kulis. "He was working security. A shooting had just taken place inside the establishment. So he was doing his job and holding onto somebody until somebody arrived. And a police officer, it's our feeling didn't make the proper assessment and fired and killed Jemel."

Midloathian police expressed "heartfelt condolences" in a statement to the family.

Sherriff's office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari said the man shot by police, "turned out to be a guy working security for the bar."

Roberson was the father of a nine-month-old son with Avontea Boose, and was planning on getting an apartment for his family with his earnings from the job, according to Rev. Marvin Hunter, who also said Roberson was a promising keyboard player at several churches including his, and "an upstanding man."

Hunter is the great uncle of Laquan McDonald who was also killed by police in Chicago in 2014.

A vigil held outside Manny's on Monday was wrought with expressions of frustration, grief, and demands for action:

"Why? Why did you kill him?" Roberson's cousin, Candace Ousley asked. "It doesn't make sense. The police officer just saw a black man. I believe if he was indeed white, he'd be alive."

Another man at the vigil said, "This was not reckless policing, this was homicidal policing. They saw a black man with a gun. If he did not have a gun, his black skin made him a weapon.

"As a community, we demand respectful engagement. We want the police to treat our people with just a certain amount of dignity and respect. They patrol the Black community like some . . . Gestapo being judge, jury and executioner."

Another vigil attendee, Harvey Alderman Keith Price, called on State's Attorney Kim Foxx to open an investigation into the shooting.

"This could have been my son. This could have been any one of our sons," Price said. "So Kim Foxx, do the right thing, open up a full out investigation. That's what you got elected for."

Lane Tech College Prep, where Roberson graduated from, tweeted a remembrance of Roberson:

Related Story: Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Jemel Roberson Remembered By Friends www.youtube.com

Wisconsin Teens Throw Up Nazi Salute in Junior Prom Photo

Bigotry continues to thrive in a state that has no diversity.

A high school in Baraboo, Wisc., is currently under investigation after a picture of dozens white male students throwing up the Nazi salute at their junior prom was recently shared on Twitter.

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Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Police officers saw, Jemel Roberson, "a Black man with a gun, and basically killed him," said a witness.

WGN Screenshot

Jemel Roberson, age 26, was working as a security guard at Manny's Blue Room bar in Robbins, Ill., when a drunken patron who he had been asked to leave earlier, returned with a gun. The patron shot four people.

Roberson, who was armed at the time, returned fire, grabbed one of the men, held him down and waited for police to arrive, according to witnesses.

"He had somebody on the ground with his knee in back, with his gun in his back like, 'Don't move,'" Adam Harris told WGN-TV.

An unnamed Midloathian police officer, according to other officers in that department who were called to assist Robbins' police, opened fire on Roberson, killing him.

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#ShoppingWhileBlack: Maryland Couple Sues Costco for $4M

A routine trip to Costco turned into a case of racial profiling.

Courtesy of WBAL TV

Barbara and Bahri Wallace loved to shop at Costco. And this trip to the megastore should have been like every other trip. However, while the couple were shopping at the Costco in Anne Arundel County in Maryland in May, the husband and wife reported they were being watched by management.

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Trump Cancels Visit to WWI Cemetery Because of Rain

"It's incredible that a president would travel to France for this significant anniversary — and then remain in his hotel room watching TV," David Frum said on Twitter.

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery dedicated to the U.S. soldiers killed in the Belleau Wood battle during World War I / YOUTUBE

Light, steady rain resulted in President Trump cancelling plans to attend a commemoration in France on Saturday to honor U.S. soldiers killed during World War I.

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