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Old White Republican Bullies Attack Kavanaugh's Accuser and Anita Hill

"You're talking about history … I'd hate to have someone ask me what I did 35 years ago," said Senator Charles Grassley. Maybe somebody should.

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Senators Orrin Hatch and Charles Grassley, both now in their mid 80s, were there for the Clarence Thomas hearings, and they bullied Anita Hill. Forty-one Republicans and 11 Democrats voted to give Clarence Thomas a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Now, they're bullying Christine Blasey Ford.


In addition to cutting the parameters to when Ford can testify, other actions include announcing that they're not conducting an FBI investigation, rushing to move forward within time to confirm Brett Kavanaugh by October, and Ford has been blamed for being confused about her own story.

Hatch suggested Ford might be "mixed up" about her accusation of sexual assault, and he said that even if Kavanaugh assaulted Ford, he should still be a confirmed: "If that was true, I think it would be hard for senators to not consider who the judge is today. Is this judge a really good man? …And, by any, measure he is."

When Grassley was asked about more witnesses being able to testify about the alleged sexual assault of Ford, like it was with Hill, Grassley said, "You're talking about history. We're not looking back. We're looking forward." He also defended Kavanaugh against allegations of sexual abuse by saying, "I'd hate to have someone ask me what I did 35 years ago."

Of Hill, Hatch claimed she was confused about who committed the sexual harassment. He also accused her of using details from "The Exorcist" to add to her story and said: "Her story's too contrived. It's so slick it doesn't compute."

Grassley also accused special interest groups of coaxing Hill to attack Thomas's character. But he's had a long dispute with what he believes in appropriate history to record, as he's spent a great deal of energy fighting The History Channel.

Related Story: Cranky Old White Men Passing Hysterical Stories About Kavanaugh's Accuser

The White House has been said to go full steam ahead on the nomination. The Senate, made up of 51 Republicans and 49 Democrats, would need 50 votes, at minimum, to confirm Kavanaugh.

Earlier this week, Grassley said: "The invitation for Monday still stands for Ford to testify. Nothing the FBI or any other investigator does would have any bearing on what Dr. Ford tells the committee, so there is no reason for any further delay."

Reportedly, Grassley is now consulting with his colleagues about Ford's requests for a plan to testify later in the week with safety precautions in place.

Ford has received harassment and death threats since her name was released and has been forced to relocate her family. There are also reports that she has concerns about being in rooms without an "escape route" and is very conscious of exits in rooms.

Meanwhile, Kavanaugh didn't acknowledge Ford's current request, as he said, in a statement, that he looks forward to the hearing on Monday to clear his name.

Related Story: Kavanaugh Supporter Compares Attempted Rape Claims to 'Rough Horseplay'

Related Story: Woman Accusing Brett Kavanaugh of Sexual Assault Willing to Testify Before Senate Panel

Update: Charges Dropped Against Mother Violently Separated From Child By Cops

Officers put on modified duty, while Jazmine Headley's one-year-old son has bruising from the struggle with police.

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez announced that Jazmine Headley, age 23, would not face charges related to her Friday arrest, and called for her immediate release. Justice Craig S. Walker of the State Supreme Court ordered her release.

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'We Want Transparency, Not Cover-Up": Jesse Jackson Gave Eulogy for Alabama Man Killed by Cops

Following the funeral of Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., a press conference on Monday called for justice as forensics revealed he was shot in the back.

Screenshot from WBRC broadcast

Over 1,000 people were in attendance at Boutwell Memorial Auditorium in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday to mourn Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr. and demand justice regarding his police-related death. Rev. Jesse L. Jackson Sr. accompanied the family and delivered the eulogy.

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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the only Black Republican in the Senate, opposed President Trump's nomination of Thomas Farr to become a federal judge, on Thursday, ending his chances of confirmation. Trump's choice — an attorney who has supported voter suppression targeting Blacks — caused Scott to defy the leader of his party's wishes.

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Non-Whites Make Up Half of Post-Millennial Generation: Study

Latinx post-Millennials represent the future of American voters. Democrats need to pay attention for 2020 and beyond.

REUTERS

A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that the "post-Millennial" generation, which are those born after 1996, "is already the most racially and ethnically diverse generation, as a bare majority of 6-to 21-year-olds (52%) are non-Hispanic whites."

The only population of youth that has grown substantially since the age of the Baby Boomers in 1968 is Latinx. They were born in the U.S. and go to college before entering the workforce.

In the 2018 midterm elections, millions more Latinx voted than in 2014.

According to Pew, "Latinos made up an estimated 11 percent of all voters nationwide on Election Day, nearly matching their share of the U.S. eligible voter population."

Exit polls for the midterms this year said 67% of youth overall voted for a House Democratic candidate and just 32% for a House Republican candidate, according to The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

Thirty-eight women of color — Black, Latinx, Native American — won seats of real power—including the youngest Congresswoman, Alexandria Oscario-Cortez, 29, a Latina.

However, Democrats lost Texas and Florida because they didn't pay attention to voter decline among Latinx (36.5 percent) across the country.

Pews' analysis on changing demographics correlates with author Steve Phillips' discussion in "Brown Is the New White," which explains that people of color and white progressive voters are America's new majority.

Democratic candidates of color and women (Stacey Abrams, Andrew Gillum, Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama) have outperformed previous candidates in statewide elections in Florida and Georgia over the last 20 years, Phillips wrote in a recent New York Times column. Abrams garnered more votes than any other Democrat in Georgia's history.

Phillips says Obama's playbook is what wins: mobilization over persuasion, along with inspiring people of all races to vote, and being strong in their positions on racism, Medicaid expansion, criminal justice reform and gun control.

"Yes, the strategy of mobilizing voters of color and progressive whites is limited by the demographic composition of particular states. But what Mr. Obama showed twice is that it works in enough places to win the White House. And that is exactly the next electoral challenge."

Phillips said, "These campaigns laid the groundwork for future Democratic success, because the thousands of volunteers, operatives and new voters will pay dividends for the 2020 Democratic nominee."

Reader Question: Do you think the 2020 candidates will tailor their approach to meet the demands of a diverse generation?

Dartmouth Professors Allegedly Used Their Positions to Sexually Assault Students

One of the predators, when sexual advances were refused, would "deprive [a female student] of academic guidance and refuse to schedule meetings to discuss her research," according to the lawsuit.

Todd F. Heatherton, William M. Kelley, and Paul J. Whalen are all under criminal investigation for sexual assault of their students at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Dartmouth, in Havover, N.H., and seven women have filed a $70 million lawsuit alleging the attacks.

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Michelle Obama Talks 2020 Presidential Election

"I think, at this point, everybody's qualified and everyone should run," Obama said, in jest. "I might even tap Sasha!"

We've never had a POTUS and FLOTUS like the Obama's before, and we've never had a Trump before. Two very different presidencies, one wrought with bigotry, racism and rampant white supremacy, and scandal, the other full of hope, unity and service. Former FLOTUS Michelle Obama says we need to pay attention to who is qualified in the next presidential election.

"I implored people to focus and think about what it takes to be commander-in-chief," Obama told Robin Roberts in a "20/20" interview, in reference to women electing a misogynist in 2016 instead of a qualified female candidate.

She expressed the importance of voting, but went beyond that to describe the kind of person qualified to run this country.

"The commander in chief needs to have discipline, and read, and be knowledgeable. You need to know history, you need to be careful with your words," she said.

"I'm going to be looking to see who handles themselves and each other with dignity and respect so that by the time people get to the general (election), people aren't beat up and battered," the former first lady, who said she will not run for president, stressed.

"I think this (Democratic nomination) is open to any and everybody who has the courage to step up and serve."

She even joked that at this point, anyone is qualified to run for president —even her daughter.

"I think, at this point, everybody's qualified and everyone should run," she said on Good Morning America "I might even tap (her younger daughter) Sasha!"

Obama and her husband were about service before, during and after the presidency.

Candidates like Trump, drunk with power, have a past, present, and future that mirror that intoxication.

Coming off midterms there are questions about what to do next — investigations of Trump, what lessons did we learn articles, predictions of the 2020 election, but getting back to what a leader, a public servant of this country is supposed to do — lead by serving its people — is a message that voters can review candidate criteria with.

"It's amazing to me that we still have to tell people about the importance of voting," she said. "People have to be educated, they have to be focused on the issues and they have to go to the polls if they want their politics to reflect their values."

Obama explained, "Where I'm at right now is that we should see anybody who feels the passion to get in this race, we need them in there. Let's see who wants to roll up their sleeves and get in the race. That's what the primary process is for."

In looking at Trump's record, most of his decisions have been made to serve himself. His record of cheating employees out of money, not paying taxes, discriminating against Blacks in terms of who could claim residency in his buildings, misogynistic comments, scandals around payoffs for affairs — none of it shows signs of service.

Obama writes in her new memoir "Becoming" how Trump's division and bigoted messaging tactics to garner a movement to propel his campaign impacted her own family's safety:

"The whole [birther] thing was crazy and mean-spirited, of course, its underlying bigotry and xenophobia hardly concealed. But it was also dangerous, deliberately meant to stir up the wingnuts and kooks."

In current times, his decisions in the White House usually involve a lot of divisive words to spark attention from white supremacists, "look what I did" moments on twitter for validation, and little about what the country needs, but instead what the country should be afraid of.

And that is not why you get the job in the first place.

HBCUs​ Set Foundation for Black Politicians in Key Positions

"Black people have always been underestimated. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people," said Senator Art Haywood, a Morehouse Graduate.

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What Kamala Harris, Alma Adams, Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams all have in common, in addition to being influential in U.S. politics, is they're graduates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities ( HBCUs) — Howard University, North Carolina A&T, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University, and Spelman College.

Approximately 40 percent of the members of Congress are HBCU graduates, according to the Network Journal, a Black professional and small business magazine. And recipients of The United Negro College Fund and Thurgood Marshall Foundation scholarships graduate from college at rates well above the national average.

"We're producing outstanding leaders in all of the major professions," said Harry L. Williams, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and former Delaware State president.

"Anytime you can look at (HBCU) success stories, it just enhances their relevancy and continues to move them forward in a positive way."

This year, a record 38 women of color were elected to Congress. Many of them are HBCU graduates.

The prospect of so many Black-college graduates being elected to statewide office in the same year is unprecedented, Keneshia Grant, an assistant professor of political science at Howard University, said.

And they are touting their HBCU training. Abrams expressed her disapproval of legislation plans for education that did not include those institutions.

Gillum responded to President Trump's tweet attacking him about his lack of Ivy League education:

Art Haywood is one of four Black state senators in Pennsylvania, and one of two from Morehouse.

"If the two Black state senators had come from Harvard or Yale, then those schools would get all the credit," Haywood said.

"Black people have always been underestimated," Haywood said. "I don't think there's any more validation required. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people."

Of politicians like Abrams and Gillum, the president of HBCU Dillard University Walter Kimbrough said they are sending a message: "It's a reaffirmation, not only for students but for families, that you can go to an HBCU and compete with anyone."

Approximately 13 percent of HBCU graduates are CEOS, 40 percent are engineers and 50 percent are professors at non-HBCUs, according to the Network Journal.

The HBCUs Make America Strong: The Positive Economic Impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities study shows how the United States economy benefits from HBCUs: $14.8 billion in economic impact. In addition, graduates predominantly come from low-income areas, giving them and the communities the opportunity to break cycles of poverty and open doors to successful and lucrative careers. Individual graduates can earn $927,000 within their lifetime, $130 billion collectively over their lifetime.

White Nationalists Feel at Home Visiting the White House

Identity Evropa leader, whose group believes in returning people of color back to native homelands, posts tour photos. Meanwhile, Trump calls Black reporter's white nationalism question "racist."

TWITTER

Patrick Casey, leader of alt-right white nationalist group, Identity Evropa, and Charlottesville marcher, posted a visit to the White House on social media this week:

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