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Old White Republican Bullies Attack Kavanaugh's Accuser and Anita Hill

"You're talking about history … I'd hate to have someone ask me what I did 35 years ago," said Senator Charles Grassley. Maybe somebody should.

REUTERS

Senators Orrin Hatch and Charles Grassley, both now in their mid 80s, were there for the Clarence Thomas hearings, and they bullied Anita Hill. Forty-one Republicans and 11 Democrats voted to give Clarence Thomas a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Now, they're bullying Christine Blasey Ford.


In addition to cutting the parameters to when Ford can testify, other actions include announcing that they're not conducting an FBI investigation, rushing to move forward within time to confirm Brett Kavanaugh by October, and Ford has been blamed for being confused about her own story.

Hatch suggested Ford might be "mixed up" about her accusation of sexual assault, and he said that even if Kavanaugh assaulted Ford, he should still be a confirmed: "If that was true, I think it would be hard for senators to not consider who the judge is today. Is this judge a really good man? …And, by any, measure he is."

When Grassley was asked about more witnesses being able to testify about the alleged sexual assault of Ford, like it was with Hill, Grassley said, "You're talking about history. We're not looking back. We're looking forward." He also defended Kavanaugh against allegations of sexual abuse by saying, "I'd hate to have someone ask me what I did 35 years ago."

Of Hill, Hatch claimed she was confused about who committed the sexual harassment. He also accused her of using details from "The Exorcist" to add to her story and said: "Her story's too contrived. It's so slick it doesn't compute."

Grassley also accused special interest groups of coaxing Hill to attack Thomas's character. But he's had a long dispute with what he believes in appropriate history to record, as he's spent a great deal of energy fighting The History Channel.

Related Story: Cranky Old White Men Passing Hysterical Stories About Kavanaugh's Accuser

The White House has been said to go full steam ahead on the nomination. The Senate, made up of 51 Republicans and 49 Democrats, would need 50 votes, at minimum, to confirm Kavanaugh.

Earlier this week, Grassley said: "The invitation for Monday still stands for Ford to testify. Nothing the FBI or any other investigator does would have any bearing on what Dr. Ford tells the committee, so there is no reason for any further delay."

Reportedly, Grassley is now consulting with his colleagues about Ford's requests for a plan to testify later in the week with safety precautions in place.

Ford has received harassment and death threats since her name was released and has been forced to relocate her family. There are also reports that she has concerns about being in rooms without an "escape route" and is very conscious of exits in rooms.

Meanwhile, Kavanaugh didn't acknowledge Ford's current request, as he said, in a statement, that he looks forward to the hearing on Monday to clear his name.

Related Story: Kavanaugh Supporter Compares Attempted Rape Claims to 'Rough Horseplay'

Related Story: Woman Accusing Brett Kavanaugh of Sexual Assault Willing to Testify Before Senate Panel

Transgender People Reject Bigoted Policy​, Say They #WontBeErased​

The Trump administration proposes that government agencies should define sex as "a person's status as male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth."

REUTERS

#WontBeErased hashtag erupted hours after The New York Times reported the Trump administration's push via a memo for a new legal definition of gender, which would essentially eradicate the estimated 1.4 million Americans who identify as a different gender than the one assigned assigned at birth.

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On Twitter, President Trump threatened to engage the military to guard the southern border of the Unites States.

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Former gymnastics president Steve Penny was arrested Wednesday for covering up evidence about misconduct concerning Larry Nassar at a Texas training center.

He was indicted for ordering the destruction of or hiding of documents pertaining to Nassar's sexual assault of young female gymnasts, including Simone Biles. The documents are still missing after being delivered to him in Indiana.

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#MeToo: Tarana Burke Notes Progress, Wants More for Black Women

"We can't wait for white folks to decide our trauma is worth focusing on," Burke said.

Tarana Burke is reflecting on the movement she created more than 12 years ago, but it's only been one year since its historic rise worldwide. It has led to women speaking out very publicly against assault. And now that it's been endorsed by the upper echelons of white women, we can celebrate its existence.

On Monday, Burke wrote on Twitter that her work supports all sexual assault survivors, but it "has always centered on Black and Brown women and girls. And it always will…"

So when she heard about Lee Daniels making a Me Too comedy, she expressed objections, saying, "We have to get in front of that."

"To put Me Too and comedy in the same sentence is so deeply offensive… that you think in this moment when we're still unpacking the issue that you can write a comedy about it."

Burke doesn't think the media really cares about the stories of Black women and other women of color.

"We can't wait for white folks to decide that our trauma is worth centering on when we know that it's happening," she told the New York Times.

"We know that there are people, whether they're in entertainment or not, who are ravaging our community. We have to be proactive, unfortunately without the benefit of massive exposure. That's our reality, but it always has been."

The majority of Black women in Hollywood have kept their experiences with sexual assault a secret. But there are a few exceptions.

Gabrielle Union has been, according to Burke, the only woman who not only speaks about her story but also advocates. Few others — Mary J. Blige, Queen Latifah, Fantasia Barrino, and Lupita Nyong'o — have talked about it publicly.

"There is knowing that even if you're not trying to bring down a Black man, a large segment of the population will say 'We don't believe her' because of all these things that we normalize," Burke said.

She recalled when a reporter wanted to do a story on R. Kelly and no one would go on record.

"A lot of folks have slid under the radar," she commented.

While she believes the Black community has doubled down on that thinking, she does note progress.

"You could not have had this kind of public discourse with this many people saying that they believe us — we literally have an example in Anita Hill," she told Paper Magazine. "We don't even have to guess what it would've been like or could've been like or what people would've said 20 years ago, we saw it."

In collaboration with the New York Women's Foundation, Burke's Me Too is helping to fund groups serving communities of color, immigrants, and LGBTQ people.

The "Fund for the MeToo Movement and Allies," awarded $840,000 to the DC Rape Crisis center in Washington, the Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective in Los Angeles, the Firecracker Foundation in Lansing, Michigan, Black Women's Blueprint and the Violence Intervention Program, both in New York; Equality Labs, a national group; and the Los Angeles-based FreeFrom, which works with survivors of domestic violence.

The partnership's goal is to raise $5 million per year.

"This is about supporting the people who support the people," Burke said.

Reader Question: Why do you think Black women's stories of sexual assault have been largely unheard or drowned out?

Courtesy of TMZ

Former Atlanta Falcon, Justin Crawford, was busted raping a 12-year-old girl and has been arrested on felony charges of sodomy, incest and enticing a minor for an indecent purpose.

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Miami Uber Driver Who Raped a Female Passenger Has a History of Predatory Behavior

Frederick Gaston told authorities sex is a "perk" of the job.

REUTERS

The trial of 51-year-old Uber driver Frederick Gaston begins on Oct. 29. Gaston is charged with raping a 26-year-old female passenger. The unidentified woman was intoxicated, vomiting and passing in and out of consciousness.

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Michelle Obama Continues Work to Empower Women and Girls

"Sorry that you feel uncomfortable, but [women are] now paving the way for the next generation," Obama says to the men who are disturbed by the Me Too movement.

Former first lady Michelle Obama continues to keep girls at the forefront of her mission as she resumes, using her powerful platform.

Obama, in a recent interview, talked about the Me Too movement and its impact, as well as the importance of girls now having to deal with the same issues.

"Change is not a direct smooth path. There's going to be bumps and resistance," she said on NBC's "Today Show," citing that many will be uneasy about the movement.

"There has been a status quo with the way women have been treated."

Obama said that women have to say to men who are disturbed by the movement, "Sorry that you feel uncomfortable but I'm now paving the way for the next generation."

"We have to think about the way we're paving for our girls," she added.

Referring to the 98 million adolescent girls not in school, she said "The stats show that when you educate a girl, you educate a family, a community, a country."

Obama has been working on international girls' education, since 2015, in a project called Let Girls Learn, which remained with the White House when the Obamas departed.

Her new project, The Global Girls Alliance, grew from a 2013 conversation in the White House with Pakistani human rights advocate Malala Yousafzai, then a teenager. Yousafzai's work focuses on girls who are denied education for war, economic pressure, cultural norms and prejudice.

Announced on the International Day of the Girl via the Obama Foundation, the organization is partnering with nonprofits like She's the First (which created the Girls First Network, a knowledge sharing community for girl-focused NGOs), Girl Up (which will ensure girls are connected to safe-spaces and girl-focused leadership), Girl's Inc. (encourages girls to understand and represent global voices through Leadership and Community Action program), and Girl Scouts of the USA (that created a toolkit to learn about girls' education from global and national perspectives).

GoFundMe will filter funds to six vetted organizations, seeking amounts from $5,000 to $50,000, at a time. When one project's goal is reached, a new organization will take its place on GoFundMe.

The last time Obama became vocal about gender equality, she was responding to Trump's "grab 'em by the pussy" and similar comments after the Billy Bush tape was revealed. Obama said it had "shaken me to my core."

"This is not something that we can ignore," Obama said in 2016. "This was a powerful individual speaking freely and openly about sexually predatory behavior, and actually bragging about kissing and groping women."

Of the current times, Obama said, "I chose to engage because there's no choice. The world is a, sadly, dangerous place for women and girls, and we see that again and again. Young women are tired of it. They're tired of being undervalued, they're tired of being disregarded, they're tired of their voices not being invested in and heard."

First Lady Michelle Obama Launches Global Girls Alliance


Reader Question: What do you think of Michelle Obama's stance toward the men who find women speaking up in and around MeToo uncomfortable?

Voter Suppression: It's Now Harder for Thousands of Native Americans to Vote in North Dakota

The Supreme Court's recent decision to uphold a voter ID law will affect the Senate race.

In her race for re-election, North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, a Democrat, is trailing her Republican opponent, Rep. Kevin Cramer. Native Americans are a key demographic in the state and tend to vote for Democrats.

But the Supreme Court decided last week not to block the state's restrictive voter ID law, which will make it almost impossible for most Native Americans to vote.

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