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Latest News

Government Shutdown Ends, Temporarily

"If we don't get a fair deal from Congress, the government will either shutdown on Feb. 15 again or I will use the powers afforded to me under the laws and the Constitution of the United States to address this emergency," Trump said.

As mounting pressure grew, President Trump is ending the longest government shutdown in history, but only through Feb. 15.

Earlier this month, Trump said he would was willing to continue the shutdown for "months, a year or even longer," if he did not get his way. Friday's announcement comes after Congressional Democrats, literally, used every ounce of their power, which was regained during the midterm elections.

Talks of building a border wall aren't off of the table. Trump has stated that during the next three weeks Democrats and Republicans will meet with homeland security experts to put together a bill to fund efforts to "secure United States' borders."

"They are willing to put partisanship aside, I think, and put the security of the American people first," Trump said. "Barrier or walls will be an important part of the solution."

"There are discussions on the Senate side," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Friday morning as she entered the Capitol. "We are in touch with them."

According to an unnamed source, a few Republican senators began to urge the president to end the shutdown and to find another way to get his wall funded.

The major outlying factors that "helped" our nation's leader come to his decision were: widespread disruptions and incredulous delays in our nation's airports. And many government employees were unable to take care of their basic needs such as: buying food and paying mortgages.

The five-week shutdown affected an astounding 800,000 employees. Trump has already signed a bill guaranteeing back pay for federal workers who haven't received pay. So, ideally, workers should receive the pay they missed in just a few days.

Obama Teams Up With NBA, FIBA to Launch Basketball Africa League

"I've always loved basketball because it's about building a team that's equal to more than the sum of its parts," Obama tweeted.

Screenshot from NBA video

It is well-known that former President Barack Obama is a basketball aficionado. From filling out his NCAA bracket to leading pick-up games at the White House, basketball has always been a part of the 44th president's life.

While some people coach high school when they retire, Obama is thinking global. On Saturday, the NBA commissioner Adam Silver announced the launch of the Basketball Africa League (BAL), a joint effort of the NBA and International Basketball Federation (FIBA). Who is the go-to player for this project? None other than Obama.

He tweeted on Saturday about BAL:

Obama will have a role with the league, but the extent of his involvement has yet to be announced.

BAL, the NBA's first collaboration to operate a league outside of North America, will be built on the foundation of current club competitions FIBA is organizing in Africa. The inaugural season will begin in 2020, and will feature squads from Angola, Egypt, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa and Tunisia.

The NBA shared a video of Obama speaking to African basketball players about the importance of sports, then hitting a long-range 3-pointer.

"I hope you know through sport that if you put in effort you will be rewarded, I hope you learn through sport what it means to play as a team and that even if you are the best player your job is not just to show off but your job is to make your teammates better," Obama says.

For years, the NBA has fostered a program, with the assistance of FIBA in Africa, called Basketball Without Borders. This program grows the game by promoting and identifying young talent from all areas.

"The Basketball Africa League is an important next step in our continued development of the game of basketball in Africa," said Commissioner Silver, in a statement. "Combined with our other programs on the continent, we are committed to using basketball as an economic engine to create new opportunities in sports, media and technology across Africa."

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez Explains Her Race and Ethnicity

"I am the descendant of African slaves. I am the descendant of Indigenous people. I am the descendant of Spanish colonizers," explained Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in an MSNBC interview.

Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez

Conversations around race and ethnicity have been prominent in the media because of the onslaught of diverse newly elected public officials. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is one of them. In an interview on MSNBC, she addressed her heritage with respect to her race.

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White Supremacist's Apology Doesn't Deter Judge From Giving Him a Life Sentence

Family and friends said the apology was insulting, and that Timothy Caughman's death was their "life sentence."

CBS 2

James Jackson, 30, a white supremacist, killed Timothy Caughman, 66, a Black man with a sword. Jackson was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

His apology: "I just wanted to apologize to everyone who has been negatively affected by this horrible and unnecessary tragedy. If I could do it all over again, this never would have happened."

Caughman's friends dismissed the apology, as fake.

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Virginia Church Pays $100,000 Worth of Debt for Howard University Students

Black students are more likely to borrow, less able to make progress on paying down their loans, and almost half defaulted on their school loans. Many do not graduate. Now 34 seniors can.

Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va., decided to clear the debt of 34 Howard students.

95 percent of Howard students are on financial aid. About 4,000 church members fasted and prayed for 30 days, saving money to donate to something charitable.

They donated $100,000 to 34 students.

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MLB Changes 'Disabled List' to 'Injured List'

Disability rights advocates urged Major League Baseball to rename the roster designation for players recovering from injury.

Major League Baseball is renaming its league-wide medical database from the commonly known "Disabled List" to the "Injured List".

"The principal concern is that using the term 'Disabled' for players who are injured supports the misconception that people with disabilities are injured and therefore are not able to participate or compete in sports," explained Jeff Pfeifer, Major League Baseball's Senior Director of League Economics and Operations, informing the league's teams in a December memo that was obtained by ESPN.

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AccuWeather to Pay $290K in Fines Over Sexual Harassment

Barry Myers, AccuWeather's former CEO, is Trump's nominee to run the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Barry Myers, former CEO of AccuWeather

Weather giant, AccuWeather, has agreed to pay $290,000 in fines after it was found that the company subjected female workers to sexual harassment and a hostile work environment.

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