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#ImWithKap: The Resounding Online Message During Super Bowl 53

During the Super Bowl, #ImWithKap was trending as many decided to point out the NFL's disregard for Colin Kaepernick.

REUTERS

Angela Davis, Ava DuVernay, Lena Waithe, Common, Steph Curry, LeBron James, Kevin Durant and more used social media to stand in solidarity with Colin Kaepernick on Super Bowl Sunday.

Former Obama cabinet secretary, Chris Lu, tweeted the sentiment right before the game started:

Interestingly enough, the Super Bowl's ratings hit a 10-year low on Sunday, as it was boring and the halftime show with the air of controversy didn't seem to help boost interest.

ImWithKap Jerseys were sported in many of the tweets as a continued sign of support.

Cardi B said she wasn't performing with Maroon 5, because someone "lost his job fighting for us."

Many boycotted the NFL and all of its Super Bowl coverage and events, including Ava DuVernay, who tweeted:

Kaepernick thanked all for the support:

Commissioner of the NFL Roger Goodell dodged questions about Kaepernick's status at a pre-game press conference. Kapernick has filed a grievance for collusion of the owners and executives to keep him off any team.

A mural of Kaepernick was demolished in Atlanta days before the game (A local artist replaced it with eight more in the city).

Maroon 5, who replaced all the artists who turned down the biggest performance stage in protest, did a show that weakly acknowledged the tension with a "One Love" light display by drones.

The lead singer, Adam Levine, defended the show, which featured rappers Travis Scott and Big Boi, and thanked critics "for always pushing us to do better." He included a list of words that he wrote down when asked to do the performance that included the word "kneel" near the bottom.

New Comedy Series is Based on the Life of a Gay Man With Cerebral Palsy

The series is written by and starring Ryan O'Connell, author of "I'm Special: And Other Lies We tell Ourselves."

Ryan O'Connell/ YOUTUBE

With "The Big Bang Theory" winding down, Jim Parsons, better known as "Sheldon," is taking a role behind the scenes as the executive producer of the new series "Special."

The show, set to debut on Netflix on April 12, is loosely based on the upbringing and experience of Ryan O'Connell, a gay man living with cerebral palsy. O'Connell authored a 2015 book called "I'm Special: And Other Lies We tell Ourselves."

O'Connell stars in the series, along with Jessica Hecht, Punam Patel, Marla Mindelle, Augustus Prew and Patrick Fabian. He also wrote the show and will executive produce with Parsons, Eric Norsoph and Todd Spiewak.

Both Parsons and O'Connell took to social media to celebrate:

O'Connell tweeted:

O'Connell has a long resume filled with stints on some prominent writing teams. He has written for MTV's "Awkward" and the reboot of "Will and Grace."

At this time, being gay is more acceptable than having cerebral palsy, he said.

"Being gay is chic now," he told NBC Out. "Cerebral palsy will never be chic."

But, hopefully "Special" will make being disabled cool just like "The Big Bang Theory" made being a nerd cool.

O'Connell has never been politically correct about his disability referring to himself as a "gimp."

"Honey, I've walked in these orthotics for 29 years. I own the f—ing right to say 'gimp,'" O'Connell said.

O'Connell's disability affects his fine motor skills and causes his muscles to be stiff.

Having a disability when you are gay is difficult, according to O'Connell. He used to refuse to go to the bathroom when he was on a date in fear that his date would notice his limp. He would avoid walking in front of people and eventually took to drugs as a way to cope with his disability.

"I had the choice to turn [my disability] into this big giant monster, or it could be this ant on the ground that I saw with a magnifying glass. And I chose to make it into a big monster," he said.

He has made that big monster morph into his ticket to stardom as he will be the main character in "Special."

Through this show, O'Connell hopes to give the unheard a voice.

White Supremacist's Apology Doesn't Deter Judge From Giving Him a Life Sentence

Family and friends said the apology was insulting, and that Timothy Caughman's death was their "life sentence."

CBS 2

James Jackson, 30, a white supremacist, killed Timothy Caughman, 66, a Black man with a sword. Jackson was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

His apology: "I just wanted to apologize to everyone who has been negatively affected by this horrible and unnecessary tragedy. If I could do it all over again, this never would have happened."

Caughman's friends dismissed the apology, as fake.

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Virginia Church Pays $100,000 Worth of Debt for Howard University Students

Black students are more likely to borrow, less able to make progress on paying down their loans, and almost half defaulted on their school loans. Many do not graduate. Now 34 seniors can.

Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va., decided to clear the debt of 34 Howard students.

95 percent of Howard students are on financial aid. About 4,000 church members fasted and prayed for 30 days, saving money to donate to something charitable.

They donated $100,000 to 34 students.

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Wisconsin GOP Lawmakers Call Kaepernick 'Controversial' and Remove His Name From Black History Resolution

"Beyond outrageous that we, as the Legislative Black Caucus, had to get the permission of our white colleagues to pass our Black History Month resolution," tweeted Rep. Shelia Stubbs.

Former NFL player Colin Kaepernick is so "controversial" to GOP lawmakers in Wisconsin that they refused to include his name in a resolution to honor prominent Black Americans during February. But for members of the Legislature's Black caucus, Kaepernick, who was born in Wisconsin, is anything but controversial.

The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback was the first NFL player in 2016 to kneel during the national anthem in protest of police brutality. Kaepernick, along with former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and baseball legend Reggie Jackson, are some of the more than two-dozen names suggested by the Black caucus to include in the resolution.

Republicans refused to support a resolution naming Kaepernick "for obvious reasons," Assembly Majority Leader Jim Steineke of Kaukauna said during a news conference on Tuesday. He added, "Colin Kaepernick is obviously a controversial figure."

Steineke and others in the GOP are following the lead of the head of their party, who has called NFL players who kneel during the national anthem "sons of bi***es."

Kaepernick is currently pursuing a grievance against the NFL. He claims that ever since he opted out of his contract with the 49ers in early 2017, team owners and executives have colluded to keep him out of the league.

Wisconsin Republicans initially blocked the Black caucus' resolution. But then they amended it to delete Kaepernick's name on a 61-34 party-line vote. Democrats had to decide whether to go against their own resolution or accept it without Kaepernick. They wound up agreeing to remove his name, and the state Assembly passed a resolution on Tuesday.

For the second year in a row, the Republicans, who are all white, in the Wisconsin Legislature objected to how Black lawmakers wanted to honor — Black History Month.

One of the Black lawmakers who authored the resolution, Democratic Rep. David Crowley of Milwaukee, called the incident "a textbook example of white privilege."

Wisconsin's population is 87.3 percent white, a much less diverse population than average.

Crowley also said that Kaepernick, who is a philanthropist, was included, in part, because he gave a $25,000 donation to a nonprofit for teens in Milwaukee called Urban Underground.

Rep. Shelia Stubbs (D-Madison) tweeted on Tuesday:

State Sen. Lena Taylor said on Wednesday, that she would offer an amendment to include Kaepernick to the resolution.

MLB Changes 'Disabled List' to 'Injured List'

Disability rights advocates urged Major League Baseball to rename the roster designation for players recovering from injury.

Major League Baseball is renaming its league-wide medical database from the commonly known "Disabled List" to the "Injured List".

"The principal concern is that using the term 'Disabled' for players who are injured supports the misconception that people with disabilities are injured and therefore are not able to participate or compete in sports," explained Jeff Pfeifer, Major League Baseball's Senior Director of League Economics and Operations, informing the league's teams in a December memo that was obtained by ESPN.

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Rep. Ocasio-Cortez to 2020 Presidential Candidates: ​'We Can Be Audacious'

In a viral video, the congresswoman talks about the Green New Deal.

In a video posted on Twitter that has more than 1 million views, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) says she doesn't want to be "placated as a progressive."

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