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Black Real Estate Broker Pays for Over 100 Homeless to Be Sheltered During Polar Vortex

Candice Payne has been hailed as a hero for saving lives.

Candice Payne, a real estate broker from the South Side of Chicago, paid for 30 hotel rooms for over 100 homeless people to be sheltered from the extreme cold last week.


Temperatures fell as low as -50 degrees with windchill in the normally Windy City. Twenty-three people across the country have died as a result of the cold, including children, elderly, people seemingly on the job, and even a man sitting at a bus stop.

"It was 50 below, and I knew they were going to be sleeping on ice and I had to do something," she said on Saturday.

She posted on Instagram that she needed help transporting people to the hotels from "Tent City," a place where the homeless have been gathering for years. Social media not only responded with transportation for the homeless, but donations to her Cash App account to help.

She put care packages together them, and they were housed and fed until Sunday. People heard about the good deed, and also called the hotel to help pay for more homeless people to stay, doubling the rooms to 60 occupied.

"We don't get that type of help," Jermaine, one of the homeless men, said. "I really needed them at that point, so they came right in time."

Julie Dworkin, director of policy for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless estimated that there are 80,000 homeless in Chicago, including people who are staying with others because they have no home of their own.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's definition of homeless differs and uses a Point-in-Time survey, which recorded 5,450 unsheltered homeless individuals in 2018. Ninety-four percent of homeless individuals are Black.

The governor of Illinois called Payne to thank her.

She said she didn't think that something like this was attainable, but after seeing people jump into action, she said, "We can all do this together."

She has received an outpouring of support, with some calling her a hero for saving lives:

Chicago woman rented hotel rooms for the homeless during deep freeze www.youtube.com

Rev. William Barber Condemns Evangelicals Who Support Trump's Policies

"I'm a Christian evangelical, I grew up in the Christian faith, and one of the most clear public policies that you're supposed to engage in as a just society is fairness toward the strangers, immigrants," Barber said.

The NAACP and Rev. Dr. William Barber called out evangelical Christians who back President Donald Trump's family separation policy, and called the policy racist.

"We see this happening," Barber said, "and this attack on children — we know it's brown children, it wouldn't be happening if it wasn't brown children at the southern border — is white supremacy, white nationalism, being implemented in our public policy right in front of our faces."

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Rep. Ocasio-Cortez Explains Her Race and Ethnicity

"I am the descendant of African slaves. I am the descendant of Indigenous people. I am the descendant of Spanish colonizers," explained Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in an MSNBC interview.

Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez

Conversations around race and ethnicity have been prominent in the media because of the onslaught of diverse newly elected public officials. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is one of them. In an interview on MSNBC, she addressed her heritage with respect to her race.

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White Supremacist's Apology Doesn't Deter Judge From Giving Him a Life Sentence

Family and friends said the apology was insulting, and that Timothy Caughman's death was their "life sentence."

CBS 2

James Jackson, 30, a white supremacist, killed Timothy Caughman, 66, a Black man with a sword. Jackson was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

His apology: "I just wanted to apologize to everyone who has been negatively affected by this horrible and unnecessary tragedy. If I could do it all over again, this never would have happened."

Caughman's friends dismissed the apology, as fake.

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Virginia Church Pays $100,000 Worth of Debt for Howard University Students

Black students are more likely to borrow, less able to make progress on paying down their loans, and almost half defaulted on their school loans. Many do not graduate. Now 34 seniors can.

Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va., decided to clear the debt of 34 Howard students.

95 percent of Howard students are on financial aid. About 4,000 church members fasted and prayed for 30 days, saving money to donate to something charitable.

They donated $100,000 to 34 students.

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MLB Changes 'Disabled List' to 'Injured List'

Disability rights advocates urged Major League Baseball to rename the roster designation for players recovering from injury.

Major League Baseball is renaming its league-wide medical database from the commonly known "Disabled List" to the "Injured List".

"The principal concern is that using the term 'Disabled' for players who are injured supports the misconception that people with disabilities are injured and therefore are not able to participate or compete in sports," explained Jeff Pfeifer, Major League Baseball's Senior Director of League Economics and Operations, informing the league's teams in a December memo that was obtained by ESPN.

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PwC: 2019 US Family Business Survey

Creating stronger foundations for the future.

Originally Published by PwC.

By Jon Flack, US Family Business Leader

Welcome to our 2019 edition of PwC's US Family Business Survey

  • 62% expect upcoming family members gain outside work experience
  • 58% have succession plans, however most are informal
  • 47% of next generation leaders take on non-senior roles in the business
  • 39% sit on the board of directors

This year's findings speak to the importance of being prepared to compete in a far more digital economy, a challenge for business leaders everywhere. CEOs globally are working to bridge gaps in their data capabilities. Yet family businesses are coming into this arena with an advantage. They have built valuable trust among loyal employees and their ownership group. So how to turn values like loyalty and hard work into a multi-generational success story? We see four moves ahead to consider to build a lasting and profitable legacy:

  1. Codify your values and purpose into your strategy. If this is where your family business has a competitive edge, take it to the next step.
  2. Ensure the next generation is deeply involved - they have a lot to offer families grappling with digitalization.
  3. Determine the skill sets needed for a more digital future. Raising the 'Digital IQ' of the business is closely entwined with raising digital capabilities of existing workforce and determining future skill sets. With 80% of US CEOs expecting AI to significantly change the way they do business in the next five years, the race for talent will only intensify. US family business leaders are aware of the challenges, keeping and rewarding employees are seen as top priorities.
  4. Professionalize the board by bringing in independent directors with external expertise in future growth areas for your business.

Thinking through the implications of a more digitally-integrated economy should not be decoupled from thinking through who should run the business in the future and who can best help guide it.

I hope these findings serves as a useful starting point for conversations you will have with the current and next generation of leaders as you set a course for continued success.

You're invited to register with us to receive the full report. Let us know if you have any questions or would like to discuss.