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Luke Visconti, CEO: Crisis in Higher Education a Long Time Coming

Unchanged for 25 years — 93 percent white presidents: stale and out of touch.

Mass protests are occurring across the nation on college campuses. Non-majority students feel disenfranchised and underrepresented. Their perceptions are not incorrect.

Excluding minority serving institutions, 93 percent of university presidents are white — demographics that have not changed in 25 years. 84 percent of (full-time) professors are white. There is slightly more diversity among assistant and associate professors but much less among all professors at private schools in comparison to public schools.

The demographics of students, and of our nation, have changed dramatically: only 58 percent of college students are white (59 percent of high school graduates are white), and more than half of bachelor's degrees are earned by women.

From "Mexican bandit" themed parties at the University of Louisville president's house, to slow and tone deaf communications from the president of Mizzou (leading to his ouster), university leadership is being exposed as mostly being out of step, out of touch and of poor quality. Social media and the BLM movement have connected the dots, leading to nationwide unease and unrest from what used to be considered isolated incidents.

Demographics alone do not make a leadership body incompetent or out of touch, but in my combined 24 years of higher education board experience, including being invited to speak at two recent college board events and dozens of universities, I think most university diversity efforts are paternalistic, toothless, lacking in vigor — in essence, not taken seriously as a part of performance management.

You reap what you sow.

There are some bright spots, though. President Sue Henderson at New Jersey City University is implementing programs modeled after the amazing success at Georgia Tech, where they closed the gap between white and nonwhite graduation rates through timely mentoring, attention to the whole student body and real-time academic advice. The Rutgers Future Scholars program continues its astonishing success in shepherding eighth graders through high school and into/through college, achieving dramatically improved results over peer groups not in the program — with 1,600 students in the pipeline.

Talent is a leaky bucket. You may be very proud of your current corporate culture, and in the case of DiversityInc Top 10 companies, it is demonstrably better than the Top 50 and an order of magnitude better than the Fortune 500. The problem, especially for the best companies, is that you're hiring from a talent pool that is not well prepared. In the case of schools like SUNY Plattsburgh and University of Louisville, the student body is dramatically less diverse than the state, and a xenophobic, anti-intellectual attitude prevails on campus. You should be very careful about hiring students from the hundreds of mediocre campuses — and some isolated "elite" Ivy and almost-Ivy schools, which have vestigial programs to introduce their privileged students to the real world and have cynically small social service efforts. The students at these schools are shortchanged by their institutions and not ready to work in a diverse workforce and a global marketplace.

Laquan McDonald Reduced to 'Second Class Citizen,' Says Family

The light sentence given to the officer who killed McDonald, "suggests to us that there are no laws on the books for a Black man that a white man is bound to honor," said his great-uncle.

Hours of testimony at Jason Van Dyke's sentencing on Friday ended in shock for one family, and relief and happiness for the other.

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Black Student in Kansas Sues School District for Racial Discrimination

The dance team's choreographer told Camille Sturdivant that her skin was "too dark" to perform because she "clashed" with uniforms.

Camille Sturdivant has filed a racial discrimination lawsuit against the Blue Valley School District for the abuse she was subjected to as a member of the high school dance team.

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Soul Legend Gladys Knight to Sing National Anthem at Super Bowl

"I am proud to use my voice to unite and represent our country in my hometown of Atlanta," Knight said. There's mixed reactions on social media.

Gladys Knight

It has been confirmed that legendary soul singer, Gladys Knight, will sing the national anthem at Super Bowl LIII in Atlanta, Ga., on Feb. 3.

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Vermont Continues to Fail Black Legislator Racially Harassed By White Nationalist

Kiah Morris resigned from her position because of the harassment, but Vermont's attorney general said he will not file charges against the perpetrators, including Max Misch.

Kiah Morris was the only Black woman in the Vermont House of Representatives, until she resigned from her position in September, after enduring years of racially motivated harassment.

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Update: White Man Who Assaulted 11-Year-Old Black Girl is Due in Court Next Month

David Steven Bell's attorney said he wasn't motivated by anything other than defending himself, but nothing spells racist like referring to a group of Black girls as "a pack of youth who trapped and surrounded" his client.

David Steven Bell, 51, is home with his family after punching an 11-year-old Black child in the face this past weekend in an Asheville mall. He was arrested, charged with three counts of assault and released in about a 24-hour period. His court date is Feb. 5.

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Trump's Government Shutdown Closes MLK Historic Sites

Ebenezer Baptist Church and most of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta are closed. "I feel a bit of sadness...I didn't expect to cry over this," said Bernice King.

Tuesday was Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday and next Monday is our national celebration of the civil rights icon.

But school field trips, celebrations, families' visits to teach children about civil rights and the values of all people being created equally are being canceled due to President Trump's government shutdown.

Thousands of people who flock to Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, where Martin Luther King Jr. was pastor, and to his home, as well as the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C., will be disappointed. They are all closed.

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