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Transgender People Reject Bigoted Policy​, Say They #WontBeErased​

The Trump administration proposes that government agencies should define sex as "a person's status as male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth."

REUTERS

#WontBeErased hashtag erupted hours after The New York Times reported the Trump administration's push via a memo for a new legal definition of gender, which would essentially eradicate the estimated 1.4 million Americans who identify as a different gender than the one assigned assigned at birth.

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'The View's' Sunny Hostin Slams Right-Wing Immigration Policy: Video

"It's always about Brown and Black people and that's not the truth," Hostin said.

Things got a little heated Monday on ABC's "The View" when co-hosts right-wing conservative Meghan McCain (daughter of the late Sen. John McCain) and Sunny Hostin got into a debate about undocumented immigrants and U.S. open borders.

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Andrew Gillum Schooled Ron DeSantis During Debate

The final gubernatorial debate between DeSantis and Gillum will take place Wednesday night at Broward College in Davie.

Ron DeSantis and Andrew Gillum / Screenshot from CNN

Sunday night's gubernatorial debate was one for the history books. The debate between Democrat Andrew Gillum and Republican Ron DeSantis took place in Tampa. It was nationally televised and issues including crime, the environment, health care, race and the leadership of President Donald Trump were the focus.

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San Francisco Giants Owner Donates to Super PAC That Warns Democrats Could Bring Back Lynchings

A radio ad featuring two Black women, that's gone viral, says that if Black voters don't support the GOP, there will be a return to the Jim Crow era.

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On the surface, the name of a political action committee — Black Americans for the President's Agenda — sounds like Black people who are in favor of President Trump wholly fund it. But, it turns out, the Super PAC has a Black figurehead, yet is funded by a number of wealthy white conservatives.

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Black Women Have Higher Rates of Life-Threatening Birth Complications

New study shows women of color have a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, even when they suffer the same health ailments as white women.

REUTERS

The University of Michigan released a study that shows women of color have higher rates of major birth problems. Many required emergency treatment such as blood transfusions — a staggering three-quarters of cases —for women suffering a serious hemorrhage.

The study of 40,873 women between 2012-2015 revealed Black women had 70 percent higher rate of severe birth-related health issues than white women, and that a disparity existed in terms of needing life-saving treatment—50.5 Black mothers vs. 40.9 white mothers per 10,000.

Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes as their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C.

"Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency stories publicly have drawn the national spotlight to the urgent need to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in care for women around the time of delivery. To drive and target those changes, we need specific data like these," said Lindsay Admon, M.D., M.Sc., the study's lead author.

Williams, who has a history of blood clots, began feeling short of breath in the hospital the day after her daughter Alexis Olympia was born. A nurse said her pain medication was likely confusing her, but Williams was persistent and it saved her life.

"Situations like these are often considered near misses, and looking at them allows us to get a better picture of who the high-risk women really are," said Admon, an obstetrician at Michigan Medicine's Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital, and a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

Maternal Morbidity: Study reveals disparities by race and ethnicity.

All women who had chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, hypertension, depression or substance use issues before giving birth had a higher risk for the continuation of those problems post-child birth, but women of color with two or more conditions were two to three times more likely to have major birth problems than white women.

White women had higher rates of depression and substance use issues than any other group, but the risk for birth problems was lower than women of color with the same health issues.

While Medicaid pays for almost two-thirds of all births among women of color, access to care is another issue that affects births and post birth health. Medicaid pays for more than a third of births of white and Asian women.

Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Blacks and Latinos were more likely than whites to face barriers in access to health care.

Between 2013 and 2015, disparities with whites narrowed for Blacks and Latinos in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, including the percentage of uninsured working-age adults, the percentage who skipped care because of costs, and the percentage who lacked a regular care provider.

Medicaid pays for most procedures for women of color.

Report on Racism in Philly Suburb School District Causes White Officials to Get Defensive

Instead of hiring a diversity and inclusion specialist to address diversity issues, they chose to hire mental health professionals and white-led university consultants.

Screenshot from Haverford School Board Video

After a report was released detailing racist incidents in the Haverford, Pa., school district and town, leadership in one of the most affluent regions in the country, with a predominantly white population, decided that diversity is not a priority.

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Dunkin' Donuts Employee in Maine Refused to Serve a Somali Model, Then Called the Cops

"This is America 2018 right here. Racism and discrimination," Hamdia Ahmed said.

A Maine Dunkin' Donuts employee refused to serve model Hamdia Ahmed, and her family, for speaking Somali and then called the police on them.

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Army Names First Woman to Lead Largest Command

Laura J. Richardson continues to set standards for women in military.

History was made when Laura J. Richardson was named the first female to lead the largest command in the U.S. Army.

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