Archived: $3.4B Class-Action Lawsuit Ends: 350,000 American Indians to Receive Payout

One of the United States’ largest class-action lawsuits came to a close yesterday as American Indians and the federal government finalized a $3.4-billion settlement that would end a 17-year battle over squandered land trust royalties. Approximately 350,000 American Indian beneficiaries will receive a total of $1.5 billion, either $1,000 or $800 payouts, as soon as December via a mailed check.


Additionally, the government will use another $1.9 billion to purchase fractioned land allotments from current proprietors and return that land to the tribe. The deal also includes a government-funded scholarship for American Indian youth.

“These settlements fairly and honorably resolve historical grievances over the accounting and management of tribal trust funds, trust lands and other non-monetary trust resources that, for far too long, have been a source of conflict between Indian tribes and the United States,” said Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. in a statement.

The lawsuit initially was filed in 1996 by Blackfeet tribe leader Elouise Cobell after she witnessed those who leased American Indian land gain wealth from selling its resources. There was no accounting of the royalties from this land that was held in trust for them by the government, actions that prolonged poverty in the American Indian community. Cobell died in 2011 from cancer.

“We all are happy that this settlement can finally be implemented,” said lead attorney Dennis Gingold in a statement. “We deeply regret that Ms. Cobell did not live to see this day.”

Another 60 similar class-action lawsuits against the government have not yet been settled. American Indian tribes across the country, including the Osage tribe in Oklahoma, the Chippewa tribe in Minnesota and the Nez Perce tribe in Idaho, await resolution and payout.

Latest News

SAIC Recognized by Forbes for Commitment to Hiring Veterans

Originally published at investors.saic.com.    Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC) has received multiple acknowledgments for its commitment to military veterans, including being named on Forbes’ list of 2022 America’s Best Employers for Veterans. Additionally, SAIC ranked #7 on the Military.com list of Top 25 Veteran Employers and was recently recognized as a…

How Raytheon Technologies Supports Veterans

Originally published at rtx.com. Raytheon Technologies ranked No. 41 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2022.   Support for military veterans and families is a pillar of Raytheon Technologies’ Connect Up initiative — and a longstanding part of the company’s culture. Employees regularly volunteer with Raytheon Technologies’…

Humana on Increasing Diversity Among Healthcare Providers

Originally published at humananews.com. Humana ranked No. 9 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2022. Meet Carole Gescheidle, Co-President of Humana’s Native American and Indigenous Network Resource Group. Carole’s mother, Mary, was born and raised on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin and grew up experiencing racism….

Hilton Reinforces Commitment to Sustainability and Local Craftsmanship with Beverage Conservation Initiative

Originally published at stories.hilton.com. Hilton is a Hall of Fame company.   Hilton announced the launch of its ‘Wild Spirit Wines of Africa’ Beverage Conservation program. In collaboration with the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) in South Africa and Under the Influence, guests can enjoy the best wines and spirits from…