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Non-Whites Make Up Half of Post-Millennial Generation: Study

Latinx post-Millennials represent the future of American voters. Democrats need to pay attention for 2020 and beyond.

REUTERS

A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that the "post-Millennial" generation, which are those born after 1996, "is already the most racially and ethnically diverse generation, as a bare majority of 6-to 21-year-olds (52%) are non-Hispanic whites."

The only population of youth that has grown substantially since the age of the Baby Boomers in 1968 is Latinx. They were born in the U.S. and go to college before entering the workforce.

In the 2018 midterm elections, millions more Latinx voted than in 2014.

According to Pew, "Latinos made up an estimated 11 percent of all voters nationwide on Election Day, nearly matching their share of the U.S. eligible voter population."

Exit polls for the midterms this year said 67% of youth overall voted for a House Democratic candidate and just 32% for a House Republican candidate, according to The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

Thirty-eight women of color — Black, Latinx, Native American — won seats of real power—including the youngest Congresswoman, Alexandria Oscario-Cortez, 29, a Latina.

However, Democrats lost Texas and Florida because they didn't pay attention to voter decline among Latinx (36.5 percent) across the country.

Pews' analysis on changing demographics correlates with author Steve Phillips' discussion in "Brown Is the New White," which explains that people of color and white progressive voters are America's new majority.

Democratic candidates of color and women (Stacey Abrams, Andrew Gillum, Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama) have outperformed previous candidates in statewide elections in Florida and Georgia over the last 20 years, Phillips wrote in a recent New York Times column. Abrams garnered more votes than any other Democrat in Georgia's history.

Phillips says Obama's playbook is what wins: mobilization over persuasion, along with inspiring people of all races to vote, and being strong in their positions on racism, Medicaid expansion, criminal justice reform and gun control.

"Yes, the strategy of mobilizing voters of color and progressive whites is limited by the demographic composition of particular states. But what Mr. Obama showed twice is that it works in enough places to win the White House. And that is exactly the next electoral challenge."

Phillips said, "These campaigns laid the groundwork for future Democratic success, because the thousands of volunteers, operatives and new voters will pay dividends for the 2020 Democratic nominee."

Reader Question: Do you think the 2020 candidates will tailor their approach to meet the demands of a diverse generation?

Pew Research Studies Most Diverse Generation

AT&T and ndustrial.io Help Lineage Logistics Improve Food Safety and Reduce Carbon Emissions

Thanks to the AT&T IoT-enabled ndustrial.io system, Lineage was able to reduce its electricity usage by 34% (per item stored) in 78 different warehouses nationwide.

Originally Published by AT&T.

Lineage Logistics ("Lineage"), a leading cold food storage operator, has teamed up with ndustrial.io and AT&T IoT to help keep food safe, save energy and reduce carbon emissions as frozen food makes its way from farms to tables across America.

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Serena Williams' 'Wakanda' Catsuit Approved by Women's Tennis Association​

The WTA's new rule modifications also offer more protection to players on maternity leave.

TWITTER

Serena Williams, a 23-time Grand Slam champion, is considered the best player in the history of tennis. So, the unnecessary obstacles Williams has to face in her career are seemingly serving as teachable moments for the tennis world.

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Michelle Obama Speaks Candidly to Black Male College Students: Video

Obama gives students advice on how to respond when someone questions if they belong.

Former First Lady Michelle Obama visited Motown Museum in Detroit and spoke with Black male students from Wayne State University, many of whom are the first in their family to attend college. Obama's message of encouragement is poignant in a time when the viewpoint of Black males in this country is so negatively skewed.

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Boeing Forecasts Continued Health and Growth for Aircraft Financing in 2019

Funding continues to be balanced, diversified and global.

Originally Published by The Boeing Company.

Boeing anticipates stable growth and broad, diversified funding will continue to support efficient aircraft financing in the next year.

The company's annual Current Aircraft Finance Market Outlook (CAFMO), released today, evaluates and forecasts financing sources for new commercial airplane deliveries in the coming year and the industry's overall delivery financing requirements for the next five years. The CAFMO also explores trends within major funding sources and their potential impact on the broader market.

"The aircraft financing market remains healthy, with adequate commercial liquidity, providing a wide range of efficient options available for our customers," said Tim Myers, president of Boeing Capital Corporation. "We expect another year of balanced funding for commercial airplane deliveries in 2019, mirroring the broader industry, primarily split between bank debt, capital markets and cash."

Boeing forecasts continued strong demand for new commercial airplanes in 2019, resulting in about $143 billion in deliveries by major manufacturers, with potential to grow to more than $180 billion by 2023.

"Driven by a growing understanding of aviation's strong growth potential and the industry's attractive returns, we continue to see innovations and first-time entrants into the market, providing increased capacity for funding new deliveries as well as pre-delivery payments, mezzanine debt financing and the secondary aircraft market," Myers said.

New to this year's report is the addition of the secondary aircraft financing market outlook, as well as expanded analysis of other funding sources, including the leasing community, tax equity and the insurance market.

Highlights of the 2019 CAFMO include:

- Funding for deliveries is expected to be balanced between commercial bank debt and capital markets and cash.

- Airlines and lessors are expected to have some of their lowest historical costs of financing.

- Capital markets continue to grow, bolstered by unsecured borrowing.

- Aircraft leasing has grown to represent more than 40 percent of in-service commercial aircraft ownership.

- Export credit agencies remain a small but critical funding source, particularly in the United States.

- Strong industry fundamentals are attracting more participants and investment in new deliveries and the used aircraft market.

The full 2019 CAFMO, as well as additional data on regional-specific financing trends and global financing markets, is available at www.boeing.com/CAFMO.

Paula Dance is North Carolina's First Black Female Sheriff

Even with this win, North Carolina's law enforcement agencies are still predominantly white and male.

Paula Dance has become the first Black female sheriff in North Carolina's history.

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NYPD Discovery Hearing Set for Cop Who Killed Eric Garner

Thursday's hearing could result in Daniel Pantaleo being terminated from the force.

Officer Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer who put Eric Garner in a chokehold which killed him, is scheduled for a disciplinary conference on Thursday that could result in the termination of his job.

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Louisiana Secretary of State Candidate Could Make History for Black Women

Collins-Greenup would be the first Black woman elected to statewide office in Louisiana.

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Running a grassroots campaign with little help from the Democratic Party, Gwen Collins-Greenup could make history as the first Black woman to be elected to statewide office in Louisiana. She would become Louisiana's first female Secretary of State since 1932, and the second ever in the state's history.

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